TheArtMarket.NYC

a consortium showcasing art exhibitions for global and local collectors highlighting galleries in New York City.
Exhibitions rotate weekly, showcasing galleries an average of 6 times per year, contributing to a release of 8-12 gallery shows every week.

[Based upon individual gallery programming]
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Nahmad ContemporaryViewing Room
Westwood GalleryViewing Room
KurimanzuttoViewing Room
Ashes On AshesViewing Room
Gladstone GalleryViewing Room
Casey Kaplan GalleryViewing Room
Marlborough New YorkViewing Room
Marian GoodmanViewing Room
Hollis TaggartViewing Room
Jack Shainman GalleryViewing Room
Tina Kim GalleryViewing Room
Mitchell-innes & NashViewing Room

Nahmad Contemporary

Founded in 2013, Nahmad Contemporary is dedicated to the presentation of innovative, historically focused exhibitions. The gallery specializes in leading Contemporary artists who rose to prominence during the 1980s, and a selection of Modern masters from the 20th century.

"Richard Prince | Cartoon Jokes"

Artist: Richard Prince

NEW YORK—Nahmad Contemporary is pleased to present Richard Prince: Cartoon Jokes, the first exhibition dedicated to the artist’s brazen, large-scale Cartoon Joke paintings. On view from Nov. 12, 2020, through Jan. 16, 2021, the presentation features an impressive selection of works created between 1988 and 1991 from this notably rare series that appropriate irreverent humor and mark Prince’s cunning foray into painting. The presentation also debuts five recent paintings of cartoon jokes from the artist’s body of work, Blue Ripples, created between 2017 and 2019.

Richard Prince, Untitled, 1988

Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas

56.14 x 48.3 inches (142.6 x 122.6 cm)

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Richard Prince, Marginalia, 1991

Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas

87.25 x 58.5 inches (221.6 x 148.6 cm)

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Richard Prince, Can’t Read, Can’t Write, Can’t Swim, 1991

Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas

96 x 75 inches (243.84 x 190.5 cm)

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Richard Prince, What A Kid I Was, 1989

Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas

74.6 x 59.13 inches (189.5 x 150.2 cm)

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Throughout his career, Prince has mined popular culture to address American societal conventions while boldly dismantling notions of authorship. Having previously dedicated his practice to photographic appropriations of media and advertisements, the artist turned his attention to cartoons in 1984 with a series of simple drawings copied verbatim from The New Yorker. Shortly thereafter, he separated the found cartoons from their captions and paired them with unrelated punch lines to create novel, enigmatic narratives. Engaging the macabre nature of classic American and Borsch-Belt comedy, Prince refined his repertoire of culled material to a distinct selection of jokes and cartoons that addresses stereotypes, sexuality, infidelity and embarrassment.
Richard Prince, Untitled (Cartoon Painting), 1989

Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas

90 x 58 inches (228.6 x 147.32 cm)

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Richard Prince, Couldn’t Read, Couldn’t Write, Couldn’t Swim, 1989

Acrylic and silkscreen on canvas

73.5 x 75 inches (186.7 x 190.5 cm)

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Richard Prince, Drink Canada Dry, 1991

Acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas

87.13 x 58 inches (221.3 x 147.3 cm)

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Richard Prince, Untitled, 2017-2018

Inkjet on canvas

84.75h x 90 inches (215.3 x 228.60 cm)

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Parlaying his notorious appropriative strategies into painting, Prince silk-screened the disjointed cartoons and jokes together onto monumental canvases beginning in 1988. At the focus of the exhibition are the paintings rendered in dynamic, monochromatic hues of orange, red, burgundy, or green, that highlight the artist’s innate mastery of color from the onset of his engagement with the medium. These works shocked and defied the expectations of the art world that was accustomed to his photographic legacy. Made during a period defined by a revival of expressionistic, gestural painting, the series marks Prince’s singular approach to the medium by way of bleak, witty cartoons and one-liners that denounce the grandiose, dramatically painterly style that dominated the New York art scene.
Richard Prince, Untitled, 2019

Ink jet on canvas

88.75 x 88.75 inches (225.4 x 225.4 cm)

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Richard Prince, Untitled, 2017-2018

Inkjet on canvas

69 x 70 inches (175.3 x 177.8 cm)

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Richard Prince, Untitled, 2017-2018

Inkjet on canvas

69.25 x 70 inches (175.9 x 177.8 cm)

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Richard Prince, Untitled, 2019

Ink jet on canvas

88.75 x 88.75 inches (225.4 x 225.4 cm)

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Westwood Gallery

WESTWOOD GALLERY NYC, established in 1995 in New York City, focuses on a contemporary program of artists, including rediscovered artist estates, current artist projects, secondary market and photography, and will present a series of exhibitions dedicated to artists in the Bowery Arts District, past and present. Gallery program encompasses art talks, worldwide traveling exhibitions, site-specific art installations, international art projects, film and non-profit collaborations. In addition to on-site exhibitions, the gallery has organized and curated numerous museum-quality exhibitions both in the U.S. and abroad.

"Unconditionally Constitutional"

Artist: Alan Steele

WESTWOOD GALLERY NYC is pleased to present Alan Steele: Unconditionally Constitutional, a solo exhibition by New York artist Alan Steele. This is his first solo show with the gallery and includes thirty new artworks as well as works from the 1990s which trace the evolution of his artistic vision. The curated exhibition highlights Steele’s concept of retrieving discarded elements from previously completed work and constructing the remnants of abstracted fragments to solve complex ideas of space, time, and identity.

Alan Steele, Unconditionally Constitutional, c., 1999

pen and ink on museum board

31.75 x 39.5 inches | 80.6 x 100.3 cm

Framed: 33 x 40.75 x 1.5 inches | 83.8 x 103.5 x 3.8 cm, Unique, Framed

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Alan Steele, Modern Equipment, Fragment 5013, 2020

marine enamel, slate paint, and acrylic on wood

38 x 38 x 4 inches | 96.5 x 96.5 x 10.2 cm

Unique, Unframed

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Steele established himself during the early 1970s as a minimalist painter working with mathematical formulae projected on a grid. Foreseeing the limitations of minimal art and painting in 1974, he started a theoretical architectural project derived from the problem of “what is a labyrinth and how would one design one?". The result was a complex labyrinth based on a matrix, soon becoming the foundation for Steele’s future work and a source he continuously references to generate new structures.
Alan Steele, Radical Interceptor, Fragment 5016, 2020

pen and ink on museum board

40 x 60 inches | 101.6 x 152.4 cm

Framed: 42.25 x 62.25 x 1.75 inches | 107.3 x 158.1 x 4.4 cm,Unique, Framed

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Alan Steele, Modern Equipment, Fragment 5022, 2020, 2020

marine enamel, slate paint, and acrylic on wood

38 x 38 x 4 inches | 96.5 x 96.5 x 10.2 cm

Unique, Unframed

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As an artist who has spent much of his childhood in the West Indies, South America and South East Asia, as well as traveling the world in search of rare tribal artifacts and mythical cultures, Steele is compelled to explore the ‘act of being’ in his artwork. His artistry is a quest to understand theories of knowledge, history and the basic relationship of objects and their attachment to tradition, culture, and global divergence.
Alan Steele, Alan Steele, 2010

pen and ink, ink, wood veneer, hand made paper, rice paper on hand made paper

19 x 25 inches | 48.3 x 63.5 cm

Framed: 21 x 27 inches | 53.3 x 69.2 cm, Unique, Framed

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​In his words regarding interpretation and identity, he writes: “Can a work of art survive the world? Can the “act of being” be unconditionally constitutional in an incomplete world? Art is the reminder of every attained mode of organization which man is committed, and through which he defines himself. Consequently art can be emotionally moving. Its emotion is not the primary violence of instinct, but the much more profound feeling with which we contemplate the structural and organized truth. Art can disclose only what is endowed with a prior discipline and imagination. It asserts and proclaims the modes of imagination and the ordered infinity of non-aesthetic aspects of experience.”
Alan Steele, Untitled, 2009

pen and ink, ink, pastel, graphite, and gouche on hand made paper

22 x 30 inches | 55.9 x 76.2 cm

Framed: 26 x 33.75 inches | 66.0 x 85.7 cm, Unique, Framed

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The exhibition’s title drawing is a triptych—composed of two containers flanking a large ruler over a plexi panel—allowing for the objective, subjective, and verisimilar viewing positions of his work’s relationships. In the leftmost container, a perforated wall allows for the view of a skeletal arm, a standard unit of measurement for a yard; in the rightmost container, a window shows the hollow interior with the same container suspended in reverse; and in the center panel, Steele places his abstracted language, superimposed by a Ticonderoga pencil displaying a ruler. In juxtaposition to the title drawing, his newest works completed during the COVID-19 shutdowns presents the COVID-19 genome sequence in conversation with his abstraction. Steele’s work is constantly processing and reanalyzing fragments to present their complex interplay, his analytic eye continuously reinventing a richly poetic and mathematic language.
Alan Steele, Modern Equipment ACT, Marityx Mereremex, 2019, 2019

marine enamel, acrylic, slate paint and ink on wood, laminate, and anodized aluminum.

22 x 73.75 x 12 inches | 55.9 x 187.3 x 30.5 cm

Unique

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Alan Steele, Untitled, 2017

pen and ink on museum board

32 x 40 inches | 81.3 x 101.6 cm

Framed: 34.25 x 42.25 x 1.75 inches | 87.0 x 107.3 x 4.4 cm, Unique, Framed

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Alan Steele was born in Caracas, Venezuela, grew up in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and received his BFA from the School of Visual Arts and MFA from Rhode Island School of Design. He studied with Jo Baer, Robert Mangold and Castro Cid, finding affinity with some of early minimal and conceptual artists, such as Ad Reinhardt, John McLaughlin, Robert Irwin, Robert Barry, Will Insley, Walter De Maria, Michael Heizer and Richard Artschwager. Later, he moved to the Bowery and helped in fabrication of his contemporaries working with Tom Wesselmann, Will Insley, and on a large scale commission project for Charles Hinman, as well as working as part of installation crew for Leo Castelli Gallery and Ileana Sonnabend Gallery. He has lived and worked on the Bowery for over four decades. Steele’s work has been exhibited internationally and is part of numerous public, corporate, and private collections. He is also a curator of ethnographic art, from Africa, The Americas, Asia, Indonesia and Oceania.

Kurimanzutto

kurimanzutto explores diverse ways to make exhibitions and to exist as a gallery. The exhibition space conceives this possibility as a field in which time and space are related progressively, simultaneously, at different speeds, marked by a possible harvest, whenever it may occur.

"Marginalia"

Artist: iñaki bonillas

kurimanzutto is proud to present Marginalia, Iñaki Bonillas’ first solo exhibition at the New York cabinet space.

Iñaki Bonillas, Marginalia, 2019

Photographic print

n/a

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In painting and sculpture, everything starts with a fixed, singular original. Then come the copies. Art books are full of them: duplicates that seek to reproduce the origin, sometimes with great faithfulness, sometimes with absolutely no respect for what was there at the start. Photography, however, is always a copy or a reproduction of itself. As observed by David Campany, expert in photography, “A painter cannot paint their painting and then decide how big it will be, or what material it will be made from”; such variables are intrinsic to the work from the beginning. But a photographer can do this, because the photographic image has no essential relationship with the scale or material chosen to present it. A photographer, Campany reminds us, takes a photo and then decides: “Are you going to view it on your phone? Are you going to print it out?... Is it going to be a billboard? Is it going to be a T-shirt? Is it going to be a fine art print? Is it going to be a record cover?” And so, when we look at a photograph, what we actually have in front of us is a series of decisions, ranging from the original framing to the final presentation of the image. Someone decides, on this particular occasion, to show it in a certain way: large, glossy, in black and white. On a different occasion, the same image might appear in such a different configuration—small, matte, in color—that it barely evokes the other at all. Books, then, are among the natural fates of photography. There, they live happily just as they are: as substitutes.
Iñaki Bonillas, Marginalia, 2019

Photographic print

n/a

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For this exhibition, Iñaki Bonillas decided to work with photography books, because he sees them as spaces in which images can unfold freely. We need only look for the same photo printed in two or three different books to understand that we don’t really know anything about it. After all, in its multiple manifestations, a photo is sometimes sepia, sometimes black and white, sometimes yellow. The framing can be as variable as the size, contrast, and even the quality, depending on the printing method. Is any of these better than the others? It’s impossible to say. Another distinguishing feature of books is how the images are laid out on the page: sometimes they appear alone, easily filling the entire expanse of the paper; sometimes they’re presented as a group, forming a grid or an unexpected composition. Some book pages display ten or 12 images so tiny that they look more like a stamp collection than anything else. Bonillas, always attentive to the paraphotographic, soon noticed the peculiarity of the paths, almost always white, that form around the sets of images. Thus, Marginalia was born: a series of collages in which the margin occupies the center of the composition and the bits of photographs construct micro-narratives around the labyrinthine white trails that lead us around the page. This is a way to approach the photographic act, but from the edges, moving away from the heart of the images to observe them obliquely. What stands out here is what doesn’t seem to matter very much, but which is actually an essential part of our everyday photo-consumption: everything that, precisely because it is found at the fringes, clearly reveals how we tend to interact with these images. And the images themselves have become not solid bodies, like paintings, but increasingly liquid and fluid ones.
Iñaki Bonillas, Marginalia, 2019

Photographic print

n/a

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The voyage narrated by Xavier de Maistre in the late 18th century, which is certainly the first known expedition around a room, is what inspired Iñaki Bonillas’s work. Bonillas decided to conduct an exercise much like the one carried out by de Maistre, who, having defied the norms of his time by not fighting in a duel, was forced to spend six weeks on the margins of society, shut away in his own bedroom. That’s where he recounted the adventures inspired not by exotic locales, but by the furniture and objects in the character’s field of vision—which doesn’t ultimately make the journey any less exciting or entertaining.
Iñaki Bonillas, Marginalia, 2019

Photographic print

n/a

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Bonillas, then, set out to create his work without leaving his studio. He spent months online, looking up other people’s travel postcards, each of which seems to illustrate an episode narrated by de Maistre in his brief self-parodying novel. In this way, the artist also plays at traveling the world without having to leave the confines of his workspace. The postcards, then, serve as visual accompaniment to a possible edition of this book. Here, though, instead of unfolding across the pages of a substantial volume, the book is compressed onto the backs of the 42 postcards—one per chapter—like notes sent from the outside world that lies just beyond the insurmountable confines of the room. Or to put it more accurately for Bonillas’s project: the notes that someone sent to the artist from the borders of that beyond. A novel in 24 little boxes, half image, half text to be read under a magnifying glass.
Iñaki Bonillas, Marginalia, 2019

Photographic print

n/a

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The photo series created for this exhibition was made by invoking an old tradition: the use of chance as a key tool in the working process. In this case, the artist gathered the shavings left over from honing the edges of different photographs, then proceeded to collect these random shapes, letting them fall onto a tabletop and settle however they felt like. Then he photographed them, in an attempt to restore what is set aside—what seems disposable and insignificant—to the center. In this way, the delicate, sinuous shavings are transformed into serendipitous sculptures that the author has likewise brought into the center of the gallery.

Ashes On Ashes

In the historic American Cement Company’s building next to MacArthur Park is a local architectural icon in Los Angeles, living proof that concrete can create elegant and beautiful buildings. Designed by Daniel, Mann, Johnson and Mendenhall (DMJM), the building was completed in 1964 and originally intended as the company’s headquarters. These days, the building houses many of the city’s top architectural firms as well as the contemporary art gallery ASHES/ASHES on the ground floor. Opening up into a fantastically tall space, a detailed copper ceiling caps the room. Concrete-cast pillars supply support throughout the building, offering a sense of depth and grandeur — a match made in heaven for the experimental nebula that is ASHES/ASHES. The gallery opened in June of 2014 with what the gallery director describes as “an art wake,” and has since been presenting art that is often pushed to the periphery in a relevant and appealing way.

"edenchrome for all"

Artist: Michael Assiff, Valerie Keane, Lacey Lennon, Luke Libera Moore, Evelyn Pustka, Andrew Ross, Darryl Westly, and Damon Zucconi

ASHES/ASHES is pleased to present edenchrome for all, a group exhibition featuring Michael Assiff, Valerie Keane, Lacey Lennon, Luke Libera Moore, Evelyn Pustka, Andrew Ross, Darryl Westly, and Damon Zucconi. The exhibition will be on view November 6 – December 20, 2020 with an opening on Friday, November 6th from 4–8pm. Gallery hours are Wednesday–Sunday, 12–6pm.

22 east 65th street, floor 4, new york city 10065

Andrew Ross and Darryl Westly, Jardin/GArden, 2020

chalk pastel and graphite paper in artist frame

44.5x38.5 inches/ 113x 87.8 centimeters

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Valerie Keane , spangle maker , 2017

acrylic, stainless steel, suspension hardware

60x28x2.5 inches/ 152.4 x 71.1 x6.4 centimeters

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They say hindsight is 20/20. But how would we measure the visual acuity of something like our surveillance state? This question becomes even trickier when you consider the fact that besides the NSA and FBI overlords, our citizens also surveil each other…

So what is to be done? Firstly, admit that there is no going backwards.
Valerie Keane , spangle maker , 2017

acrylic, stainless steel, suspension hardware

60x28x2.5 inches/ 152.4 x 71.1 x6.4 centimeters

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Valerie Keane , spangle maker , 2017

acrylic, stainless steel, suspension hardware

60x28x2.5 inches/ 152.4 x 71.1 x6.4 centimeters

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This is not a love letter to Luddites…

Amidst the backdrop of blur and noise, the data-sphere folds back onto “real life” in unsettling ways; that very distinction is dubious. From the bank to your bedroom, a thick layer of informational excretion coats every surface you touch – every pair of lips you kiss. Unbeknownst to you, your sex dreams last night were designed by a chic Manhattan marketing firm, tailored to your desires with the help of your browser cache.
Michael Assif, Weeds (WDFY04 Vidia Purple / WDMN02 Pink bow Beauty) , 2020

methacrylic plastic, copper, steel, acrylic, latex paint and gesso on cotton

47 x 58.75 x 3 inches / 119.4 x 149.2 x 7.6 centimeters

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Michael Assif, Weeds (WDFY04 Vidia Purple / WDMN02 Pink bow Beauty) , 2020

methacrylic plastic, copper, steel, acrylic, latex paint and gesso on cotton

47 x 58.75 x 3 inches / 119.4 x 149.2 x 7.6 centimeters

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So what is to be done? Firstly, admit that there is no going backwards.

This is not a love letter to Luddites…

We’ll take what is helpful. Then, I suggest, we poison the well.
Michael Assif, Weeds (WDFY04 Vidia Purple / WDMN02 Pink bow Beauty) , 2020

methacrylic plastic, copper, steel, acrylic, latex paint and gesso on cotton

47 x 58.75 x 3 inches / 119.4 x 149.2 x 7.6 centimeters

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Luke Libera Moore, Pan-Historical Meta Transistor (Prototype/Relic), 2020

carved polysterene, caast plaster with mineral pigment, scavenged appliance parts, glass lens, matte enamel, acrylic

45 x 41 x 8 inches / 114.3 x 104.1 x 20.3 centimeters

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Overload the data stream that suffocates you — that separates your body from mine. Flood it with subversive falsehoods, pirated re-edits, malware, corrupted files, and “dirty data” — an industry term for unkempt or faulty information.

In fact, “dirty data” is a poignant choice of terminology. It points to that which is tainted by matter — matter out of place – something soiled by the stubborn imperfections of thingness — that which resists easy abstraction into pure binary – the profound and messy fullness of a life irreducible to a mere typology of this or that, zero or one.

So consider this a speculative proposition for a preemptive attack; a sneaky poison dart subterfuge against the tyrant A.I. of our not so distant future.
Luke Libera Moore, Pan-Historical Meta Transistor (Prototype/Relic), 2020

carved polysterene, caast plaster with mineral pigment, scavenged appliance parts, glass lens, matte enamel, acrylic

45 x 41 x 8 inches / 114.3 x 104.1 x 20.3 centimeters

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Luke Libera Moore, Black Friday Sale,2:43 PM:November 29th,2019; Poughkeepsie, NY, 2020

acrylic-xerox transfer in artists frame

15 x 12x 4 inches / 38.1 x 30.5 x 10.2 centimeters

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We invented a name for this poison (or is it a cure?): edenchrome

And there’s enough for everyone.
— Luke Libera Moore

Gladstone Gallery

Gladstone Gallery specializes in modern and contemporary art with locations in New York and Brussels.

"Carroll Dunham"

Artist: Carroll Dunham

Gladstone Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition by Carroll Dunham, featuring new paintings from his ongoing wrestler series. Dunham’s newest groups of wrestling matches are set amidst barren landscapes, deserted for all but one single tree, wherein the aggressive men are locked into differing moments of struggle. Employing formal techniques developed throughout his career, the works exemplify Dunham’s unique ability to continually recontextualize his distinct visual language through new and recurring modes of artmaking.

Carroll Dunham, Winners and Losers (1/8), 2019-2020

Urethane, acrylic and pencil on linen

60 x 45 inches (152.4 x 114.3 cm)

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Carroll Dunham, Winners and Losers (3/8), 2019-2020

Urethane, acrylic and pencil on linen

60 x 45 inches (152.4 x 114.3 cm)

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The exhibition’s first group of paintings, the series Winners and Losers, is organized around an internally referential system, in which a definitive set of formal parameters informs how the figures move and interact with one another. Capturing the conclusion of their fights, these scenes depict the winners, mounted atop the losers, in varying emotional states – some are triumphant, some anguished, others more subdued. The intensity of their prior confrontations is emphasized by the overlapping layers of paint and pencil applied across the surfaces of their bodies. The artist’s brilliant pencilwork is particularly highlighted in a work such as Winners and Losers (4/8), wherein a secondary, apparitional outline of the winner shadows the finished figure. Taken in as a whole, this series both balances and juxtaposes the straightforward logic of a system of formal variables against the physical and psychological mayhem of the scenes depicted.
Carroll Dunham, Big Men Up Close/one, 2019-2020

Urethane, acrylic and pencil on linen

45 x 48 inches (114.3 x 121.9 cm)

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Other groups of interconnected paintings – Big Men and Big Men Up Close – document the dramatic actions of Dunham’s protagonists mid-fight. In the large-scale Big Men works, Dunham portrays the distress and helplessness of one man at the hands of a stronger opponent. These struggles are memorialized through the impactful scale, as well as the confident, bold outlining of the figures. The acrobatic maneuvers that force their bodies to contort within the boundaries of the picture plane further intensify the dynamism of these complex confrontations. This vitality carries into the series Big Men Up Close, where Dunham tightly crops these fights into smaller, square-format vignettes, reminiscent of earlier bodies of work, such as Edge of His World (2002- 03) and Dead Space (2005). Pushing the figures to the forefront, these works offer a more intimate view of the protagonists, and Dunham renders the stoicism and turmoil of their expressions and choreographies with tremendous detail and emotion. Throughout the works for this exhibition, Dunham demonstrates his fascination and uncanny ability to play with scale, orientation, and composition in order to create vivid, psychologically challenging works that encapsulate the complexity of his subjects’ worlds.
Carroll Dunham, Big Men Up Close/three, 2019-2020

Urethane, acrylic and pencil on linen

45 x 48 inches (114.3 x 121.9 cm)

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Carroll Dunham was born in 1949 and lives and works in New York and Connecticut. Most recently, Dunham was the subject of a major two-person exhibition at Kunsthalle Düsseldorf, “Carroll Dunham / Albert Oehlen Bäume / Trees,” which recently traveled to the Sprengel Museum, Hannover, Germany. His work has been the subject of numerous solo exhibitions at international institutions including Museum Ludwig, Cologne; Millesgården, Stockholm; Drammens Museum, Drammen, Norway; a mid-career retrospective was held at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York. Dunham has also been included in notable group exhibitions including multiple Whitney Biennials and SITE Santa Fe; and at institutions including Musée d’art moderne et contemporain, Geneva; the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museu Picasso, Barcelona; and The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston.

Casey Kaplan Gallery

Casey Kaplan is a contemporary art gallery in New York City, in the United States.

"Sarah Crowner"

Artist: Sarah Crowner

Casey Kaplan is pleased to announce an exhibition of recent work by Sarah Crowner. The show, Crowner’s third with the gallery, debuts a new series of large-scale paintings and will be on view from October 29, 2020 - January 16, 2021.

Sarah Crowner, Medusa With Open Forms, 2020

Acrylic On Canvas

70 X 60 In/ 177.8 X 152.4cm

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Sarah Crowner, Fiery One, 2020

Acrylic On Canvas, Sewn

74 X 68 In/ 187.96 X 172.72cm

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The paintings in the exhibition demonstrate Crowner’s continually innovative approach to the medium and affinity for formal play. Each composition is made using the unique methodology that has come to define her practice, whereby individual sections of canvas are cut from patterns, painted, and sewn back together. Often forms are recycled or repurposed in a collage-like process; patterns emerge from the negative shapes of older paintings, or an entire composition might be spliced and reimagined on the studio floor. In these new works, the artist expands her visual language through acute variations in scale and color, with an emphasis on secondary colors such as, bright violets, searing oranges and dense grassy green, creating an exuberant, polychromatic environment. Most of the canvases are two-toned, engaging a spatial play between foreground and background through only two contrasting hues, or using raw canvas. The application of acrylic paint in each composition varies from densely saturated swatches of canvas that appear dyed, to loose and familiar expressionist brushwork, to even lighter washes of color that recall the soak-stain technique of Helen Frankenthaler. Proficiently executed, with a keen focus on texture and surface, the artworks reveal the unlimited potential of a singular color.
Sarah Crowner, Night Painting With Verticals, 2020

Acrylic On Canvas, Sewn

72 X 208 In/ 182.88 X 528.32cm

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Cohesively, the paintings in the exhibition do not follow a shared pattern, but rather each adhere to their own internal logic. Some compo- sitions resemble the calculated, geometric repetition of hard-edge painting, design, or woodblock printing. Others are more biomorphic and bear incidental, studio-accrued markings, engaging histories of abstract expressionism, color field and process-based painting. These differing formal and referential qualities lend each painting a distinct character, as if actively asserting their individuality, fluctuating from buoyant, first light elation to elusive, nocturnal guile; the prudent rational of Apollo to the frenetic passions of Dionysus. Many maintain a feeling of transient motion, for instance the undulating tendrils of raw canvas in “Medusa” (2020) that appear to slither across the canvas, like the mythological snakes cited in the painting’s title. A similar gesticulation and dramaturgy is found in two, large-scale, horizontal panels: “Orange and Others” and “Night Painting with Verticals” (both 2020) that, installed together, create a panoramic effect. The individual compositions unfold bidirectionally, legible from stage left or stage right. Symmetry is suggested, but withheld as shapes are reproduced, spliced, contorted and cut off in their turbulent tumble across the canvas.
Sarah Crowner, Medusa , 2020

Acrylic On Canvas, Sewn

120 X 104 In/ 304.8 X 264.16cm

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Sarah Crowner, Double Green , 2020

Acrylic On Canvas, Sewn

76 X 66 In/ 193.04 X 167.64cm

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This atmosphere of movement assimilates Crowner’s own physical and performative practice, whereby she shifts between the studio floor and the wall, deconstructing and rearranging canvas segments and allowing her compositions to settle intuitively within the picture plane. Through this process, each shape - repeated or unique - functions as an abstract building block that can be used to create new narratives. Culling inspiration from art history and the organic world, the works in the exhibition maintain a kinetic and fertile quality, rife with the lush hues of nature. With a masterful handling of surface, color and form, Crowner continues to challenge the constraints of material and embrace the endless possibilities of abstraction.
Sarah Crowner, Rising Violets 2020, 2020

Acrylic On Canvas, Sewn

92 X 65 In/233.68 X 165.1cm

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Sarah Crowner, Dream Fruit , 2020

Acrylic On Canvas, Sewn

80 X 64 In/ 203.2 X 162.56cm

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Sarah Crowner, Orange And Others , 2020

Acrylic On Canvas, Sewn

76 X 204 In/ 193.04 X 518.16cm

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Sarah Crowner, Sliced Black and Blue, 2020

Acrylic on canvas, sewn

70 x 72"/ 177.8 x 182.88cm

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Sarah Crowner, Sliced Black and Blue, 2020

Acrylic on canvas, sewn

70 x 72"/ 177.8 x 182.88cm

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Sarah Crowner (b. 1974, Philadelphia, PA) lives and works in New York. Forthcoming exhibitions and projects include The Museo Amparo, Puebla, Mexico, Fall 2021 and a large-scale commission for the US Embassy of Honduras in 2022. Recent projects include participation in the 57th edition of the Carnegie International (2018); scenography and costume design for Jessica Lang’s “Garden Blue” with the American Ballet Theater (2018); as well as the permanent site-specific installation at the Wright Restaurant at the Guggenheim Museum (2017.) In 2013 Crowner participated in a major survey exhibition on abstract painting at the Walker Art Center in MN and was included in the 2010 Whitney Biennial curated by Francesco Bonami and Gary Carrion-Murayari. Her work is held in the collections of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, TX; the Walker Art Cen- ter, Minneapolis; the Carnegie Museum, Pittsburgh, PA; and the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, North Adams, MA amongst others.

Marlborough New York

Founded in 1946 in London, Marlborough is widely recognized as one of the world’s leading contemporary art galleries. Marlborough began as representatives for a new generation of post-war British artists, such as Henry Moore and Francis Bacon. The gallery quickly expanded its business to 19th century secondary market dealings in Edgar Degas, Mary Cassatt, Signac, Claude Monet, Camille Pissarro and Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Through the 1960s, Marlborough presented exhibitions of new work by Francis Bacon, Clyfford Still, Henry Moore, Jackson Pollock, David Smith and Egon Schiele. In 1969, Marlborough presented the era-defining exhibition of Phillip Guston’s first figurative paintings in New York.

"(an exhibition of seminal photographs)"

Artist: Brassaï

The Directors of Marlborough New York are pleased to present Brassaï, an exhibition of seminal photographs by the lauded Franco-Hungarian artist that redefined the collective perception of nocturnal Paris and its underground subcultures during the 1930s. The exhibition will open on Tuesday, December 1, 2020, and will remain on view through Saturday, January 30, 2021. Comprised of 39 photographs printed by the artist, the exhibition culls some of his most iconic images from the series Paris by Night, Secret Paris, Paris by Day, and The Artists of My Life.

Brassaï, Au Monocle, Le bar, A gauche: Lulu de Montparnasse (Le Monocle, the Bar, on the left is Lulu de Montparnasse), c., 1932-1933

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 10 1/8 x 8 1/16 in. / 25.7 x 20.5 cm , sheet: 11 3/8 x 8 13/16 in. / 28.9 x 22.4 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, Au Monocle, un couple (Fat Claude and her Girlfriend at Le Monocle), c., 1932

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 13 3/4 x 10 3/8 in. / 34.9 x 26.4 cm, sheet: 15 7/8 x 11 7/8 in. / 40.3 x 30.2 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï (1899-1984) primarily favored living la vie de noctambule (the life of a nightwalker) during the years in which he was capturing scenes around Paris for his photographic series: climbing towers and balconies, surveying quiet parks through locked fences, and walking the Seine, the railroad tracks and the boulevards.
Brassaï, Au Monocle, Jeune invertie (Woman Dressed as a Man at Le Monocle, Montparnasse), c., 1932

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 14 3/16 x 10 3/4 in. / 36.0 x 27.3 cm, sheet: 15 1/8 x 11 5/8 in. / 38.4 x 29.5 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, Fille de joie jouant au billard russe, boulevard Rochechouart, Montmartre (A prostitute playing Russian billiards, Boulevard Rochechouart, Montmartre), c., 1932

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 14 1/4 x 10 3/4 in. / 36.2 x 27.3 cm, sheet: 15 3/4 x 11 3/4 in. / 40.0 x 29.8 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, ‘Bijou’ au bar de la Lune, Montmartre (‘Bijou’, Bar de la Lune, Montmartre), 1932

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 13 1/2 x 10 1/4 in. / 34.3 x 26 cm, sheet: 15 5/8 x 11 1/2 in. / 39.7 x 29.2 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, Un couple au bal Magic-City (A couple at the Magic-City Ball), c., 1931-1933

ferrotype gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 11 1/2 x 8 5/8 in. / 29.2 x 21.9 cm, sheet: 11 1/2 x 8 5/8 in. / 29.2 x 21.9 cm

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In 1976, he explained, “I was eager to penetrate this other world, this fringe world, the secret, sinister world of mobsters, outcasts, toughs, pimps, whores, addicts, inverts. Rightly or wrongly, I felt at the time that this underground world represented Paris at its least cosmopolitan, at its most alive, its most authentic.”
Brassaï, Le bal des Invertis au Magic-City, rue Cognac (The Magic-City drag ball, Rue Cognac), 1932

ferrotype gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 11 x 9 1/8 in. / 27.9 x 23.2 cm, sheet: 11 x 9 1/8 in. / 27.9 x 23.2 cm

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Brassaï, Bal du Magic-City, couples (Bal du Magic-City, Couples), c., 1932

ferrotype gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 11 x 9 1/8 in. / 27.9 x 23.2 cm, sheet: 11 x 9 1/8 in. / 27.9 x 23.2 cm

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Brassaï, Couple au Bal Nègre, rue Blomet, (Couple at the Bal Nègre, Rue Blomet), c., 1932

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 10 1/8 x 8 in. / 25.7 x 20.3 cm, sheet: 11 5/8 x 9 1/16 in. / 29.5 x 23 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, L’élection du plus beau modèle, au bal de La Horde (The election of the most beautiful model, Bal de La Horde), c., 1932

gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 11 9/16 x 9 1/8 in. / 29.4 x 23.2 cm, sheet: 11 9/16 x 9 1/8 in. / 29.4 x 23.2 cm

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Brassaï, Kiki avec son accordéoniste, au Cabaret des fleurs, à Montparnasse (Kiki with her accordion player at the Cabaret des Fleurs, Rue de Montparnasse), c., 1932

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 10 1/8 x 8 1/4 in. / 25.7 x 21 cm, sheet: 11 5/8 x 9 in. / 29.5 x 22.9 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, Vue plongeante sur la scène des Folies-Bergère (Plunging view onstage at the Folies-Bergère), 1932

gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 11 1/2 x 9 1/4 in. / 29.2 x 23.5 cm, sheet: 11 1/2 x 9 1/4 in. / 29.2 x 23.5 cm

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Brassaï never exposed more than two or three negatives of a subject. Such quick decisions demonstrate his prowess for capturing fleeting moments, a skill which certainly served him well in the crowded cafes and dancehalls as well as in dark alleys where lingering was unwise.
Brassaï, La femme de l’homme gorille, dans sa danse de Loïe Fuller, place d’Italie (The woman of ‘The Gorilla Man’, a dance by Loïe Fuller, Place d’Italie), 1933

ferrotype gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 9 1/8 x 11 3/4 in. / 23.2 x 29.9 cm, sheet: 9 1/8 x 11 3/4 in. / 23.2 x 29.9 cm

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Brassaï, Le Bal des Quatre-Saisons (Bal des Quatre-Saisons), c., 1932

ferrotype gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 8 7/8 x 11 1/2 in. / 22.5 x 29.2 cm, sheet: 8 7/8 x 11 1/2 in. / 22.5 x 29.2 cm

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Brassaï, La femme de l’homme gorille, dans sa danse de Loïe Fuller, place d’Italie (The woman of ‘The Gorilla Man’, a dance by Loïe Fuller, Place d’Italie), 1933

ferrotype gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 9 1/8 x 11 3/4 in. / 23.2 x 29.9 cm, sheet: 9 1/8 x 11 3/4 in. / 23.2 x 29.9 cm

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Brassaï, Le Bal des Quatre-Saisons (Bal des Quatre-Saisons), c., 1932

ferrotype gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 8 7/8 x 11 1/2 in. / 22.5 x 29.2 cm, sheet: 8 7/8 x 11 1/2 in. / 22.5 x 29.2 cm

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Brassaï, Groupe joyeux au bal musette des Quatre-Saisons (A happy group at the Bal des Quatre-Saisons), 1932, 1932

gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 11 3/4 x 9 in. / 29.9 x 22.9 cm, sheet: 11 3/4 x 9 in. / 29.9 x 22.9 cm

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Brassaï, Couple fâché au bal des Quatre-Saisons, rue de Lappe, Paris (Lover’s Quarrel, Bal des Quatre-Saisons, rue de Lappe, Paris), c., 1932

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 11 3/4 x 9 1/4 in. / 29.9 x 23.5 cm, sheet: 15 1/4 x 11 in. / 38.7 x 27.9 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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The selection of images from Brassaï’s nighttime series form a sort of visual time capsule depicting the many facets of what the colorful Parisian nightlife of the 1930s had to offer. Reminiscing in later years, Brassaï recalled that he and the poet Jacques Prevért “reveled in the beauty of” what they believed to be, at the time, “sinister things.”
Brassaï, Chez ‘Suzy’, la presentation (At Suzy’s, introductions), c., 1932-1933

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 11 1/2 x 8 3/4 in. / 29.2 x 22.2 cm, sheet: 12 x 9 in. / 30.5 x 22.9 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, Armoire à glace dans un hôtel de passe, rue Quincampoix (Mirrored wardrobe in a brothel, Rue Quincampoix), 1932

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 13 3/4 x 10 13/16 in. / 34.9 x 27.5 cm, sheet: 16 x 12 in. / 40.6 x 30.5 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, La toilette dans un hôtel de passe, rue Quincampoix (Washing up in a brothel, Rue Quincampoix), c., 1932

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 7 11/16 x 10 5/8 in. / 19.5 x 27 cm, sheet: 9 1/8 x 11 3/4 in. / 23.2 x 29.8 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, Nature morte, une fumerie d’opium, avenue Bosquet, le plateau avec les pipes… (Still life, an opium den, Avenue Bosquet. A tray with pipes, pins, oil lamp...), c. 1931, 1931

ferrotype gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 11 3/8 x 8 1/2 in. / 28.9 x 21.6 cm, sheet: 11 3/8 x 8 1/2 in. / 28.9 x 21.6 cm

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Brassaï, Deux voyous de la bande du Grand Albert, quartier Italie (Members of the Big Albert gang, Place d’Italie), 1932

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 10 1/8 x 7 7/8 in. / 25.7 x 20 cm, sheet: 11 3/4 x 9 1/8 in. / 29.8 x 23.2 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Appearances by notorious figures of the queer scene of Montparnasse like Fat Claude and Madame Bijou serve as formidable foils to the portraits of lionized male artists— Braque, Maillol, Miró, and Picasso, which are also on view. The exhibition articulates the artist’s egalitarian eye, the same dignity afforded to the master artist shown in his prime is given to the so-called “doyen” of the Parisian vagabonds.
Brassaï, Fumeurs preperants les pipes (Smokers preparing their pipes), 1931

gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 9 1/8 x 11 3/4 in. / 23.2 x 29.9 cm, sheet: 9 1/8 x 11 3/4 in. / 23.2 x 29.9 cm

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Brassaï, Monsieur B. revêtu d’un kimono à brocart d’or (Mr. B in a kimono with gold brocade), 1931

gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 9 x 11 1/2 in. / 22.9 x 29.2 cm, sheet: 9 x 11 1/2 in. / 22.9 x 29.2 cm

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Brassaï, Fille de joie, quartier Italie (Streetwalker, Quartier Italie), 1932

gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 15 3/8 x 11 1/8 in. / 39.1 x 28.3 cm, sheet: 15 3/8 x 11 1/8 in. / 39.1 x 28.3 cm

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Brassaï, Mon premier portrait de Dalí (My first portrait of Dalí), c., 1932-1933

ferrotype gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 14 3/4 x 11 in. / 37.5 x 27.9 cm, sheet: 14 3/4 x 11 in. / 37.5 x 27.9 cm

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Brassaï, Kokoschka dans son jardin (Kokoschka in his garden), 1931

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 10 x 14 1/2 in. / 25.4 x 36.8 cm, sheet: 11 1/2 x 15 5/8 in. / 29.2 x 39.7 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, Dalí et Gala dans leur studio Parisien, 14e, Paris (Dalí and Gala in their Paris studio, Fourteenth Arondissement, Paris), c., 1932-1933

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 10 5/8 x 14 1/2 in. / 27.0 x 36.8 cm, sheet: 11 3/4 x 15 1/2 in. / 29.8 x 39.4 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, Maillol finissant sa grande sculpture, La Montagne (Maillol finishing his large sculpture, La Montagne), 1936

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 13 3/4 x 9 3/4 in. / 34.9 x 24.8 cm, sheet: 15 3/4 x 11 3/4 in. / 40 x 29.8 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, Le mur de l’atelier avec ses images, chez Bonnard (A wall in Bonnard’s house with his favorite images), 1946

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 10 7/8 x 7 5/8 in. / 27.6 x 19.4 cm, sheet: 12 x 9 in. / 30.5 x 22.9 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, Picasso au poêle, rue des Grands Augustin, 6e, Paris (Picasso by his stove, Rue des Grands Augustins, Sixth Arrondissement, Paris), 1939

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 14 3/4 x 11 in. / 37.5 x 27.9 cm, sheet: 14 3/4 x 11 in. / 37.5 x 27.9 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, Braque au poêle, Derrière, Le Billard, rue de Douanier (Braque by his stove, his painting Le Billard behind, Rue de Douanier), 1946

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 13 7/8 x 10 1/2 in. / 35.2 x 26.7 cm, sheet: 15 1/2 x 11 5/8 in. / 39.4 x 29.5 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, Joan Miró à Barcelona, Barrio Chino (In a bar at the Barrio Chino, Miró drinks a glass of sherry), 1955

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 10 3/4 x 8 1/8 in. / 27.3 x 20.6 cm, sheet: 11 3/4 x 9 1/4 in. / 29.8 x 23.5 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, La fête foraine, place d’Italie (The Fun Fair, Place d’Italie), 1931

ferrotype gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 10 x 8 1/2 in. / 25.4 x 21.6 cm, sheet: 10 x 8 1/2 in. / 25.4 x 21.6 cm

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Brassaï, Le parvis de Notre-Dame (The square at Notre-Dame), 1932

ferrotype gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 9 1/8 x 6 5/8 in. / 23.2 x 16.8 cm, sheet: 9 1/8 x 6 5/8 in. / 23.2 x 16.8 cm

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Brassaï, L’Academie Julian, rue du Dragon, 6e, Paris (Academy Julian, Rue du Dragon, Sixth Arrondissement, Paris), c., 1931-1932

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 14 1/2 x 10 3/4 in. / 36.8 x 27.3 cm, sheet: 15 1/4 x 11 1/2 in. / 38.7 x 29.2 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, Clochard dormant à Marseille (Sleeping vagabond in Marseille), 1937, 1937

gelatin silver print on double weight paper

image: 14 3/4 x 10 1/8 in. / 37.5 x 25.7 cm, sheet: 16 x 12 in. / 40.6 x 30.5 cm

recto: signed, lower right

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Brassaï, Le doyen de clochards parisiens, boulevard Saint-Jacques (The Dean of Parisian vagabonds, Boulevard Saint-Jacques), 1934, 1934

ferrotype gelatin silver print on single weight paper

image: 11 3/4 x 9 1/8 in. / 29.9 x 23.2 cm, sheet: 11 3/4 x 9 1/8 in. / 29.9 x 23.2 cm

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This will be the first time in nearly forty years that Marlborough will showcase Brassaï’s photography. Anne Wilkes Tucker, author of Brassaï: The Eye of Paris (Museum of Fine Arts Houston, 1999), has contributed a new essay for a fully illustrated publication that will accompany the exhibition.

Marian Goodman

For over forty years, Marian Goodman Gallery has played an important role in introducing European artists to American audiences and helping to establish a vital dialogue among artists and institutions working internationally.

"Julie Mehretu: about the space of half an hour"

Artist: Julie Mehretu

Marian Goodman Gallery is pleased to present about the space of half an hour, a solo exhibition of new work by Julie Mehretu, now on view through Wednesday, December 23rd, 2020. This will be the third solo exhibition of the artist at Marian Goodman Gallery, New York.

Julie Mehretu, Conversion (S.M. del Popolo/after C.), 2019-2020

Ink and acrylic on canvas

96 x 120 in. (243.8 x 304.8 cm)

24531

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Marian Goodman Gallery is delighted to announce about the space of half an hour, a solo exhibition of new work by Julie Mehretu that will open on Monday, November 2nd and be on view through Wednesday, December 23rd, 2020. This will be the third solo exhibition of the artist at Marian Goodman Gallery, New York. The show coincides with her ongoing retrospective survey from 1996 to the present, which was shown first at LACMA, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California, and is currently on view at The High Museum in Atlanta, prior to traveling to the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, and to The Walker Museum of Art in Minneapolis.
Julie Mehretu, Maahes (Mihos) torch, 2018-2019

Ink and acrylic on canvas

96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm)

24522

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Julie Mehretu, about the space of half an hour (R. 8:1) 1, 2019-2020

Ink and acrylic on canvas

96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm)

24527

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Referencing the book of Revelation and presaging the threshold of foreboding silence in heaven after the breaking of the seventh seal, about the space of half an hour will include new paintings completed over the past year. Comprised of two distinct bodies of work, the first cycle of works was initiated prior to the pandemic, and the second cycle was made during the shutdown, in quarantine in upstate New York at Denniston Hill – an artist collective and residency program founded by Mehretu, Paul Pfeiffer and Lawrence Chua as a site for interdisciplinary creation, interrogation and debate.
Julie Mehretu, about the space of half an hour (R. 8:1) 2, 2019-2020

Ink and acrylic on canvas

96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm)

24530

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Julie Mehretu, about the space of half an hour (R. 8:1) 3, 2019-2020

Ink and acrylic on canvas

96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm)

24526

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Mehretu’s new works reimagine abstraction and her language of gestural marks in an epic theater of saturated color. Providing vistas of clarity and opacity, transparency and impenetrability, Mehretu builds her compositions with blurs of light and contour. Navigating disruption and cohesion through motion and gravity – swirls, marks, streaks, halftone patterns, and glitchy computer shapes – Mehretu punctuates her paintings with vibrant color, indenting recesses’ and opaque intervals of space and time below.
Julie Mehretu, about the space of half an hour (R. 8:1) 4, 2019-2020

Ink and acrylic on canvas

96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm)

24524

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Julie Mehretu, about the space of half an hour (R. 8:1) 5, 2019-2020

Ink and acrylic on canvas

96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm)

24528

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Julie Mehretu, about the space of half an hour (R. 8:1) 6, 2019-2020

Ink and acrylic on canvas

96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm)

24529

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Julie Mehretu, about the space of half an hour (R. 8:1) 7, 2019-2020

Ink and acrylic on canvas

96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm)

24525

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Presented in the North Gallery, the suite of seven paintings created during the Covid shutdown is embodied by emergent images whose traces are both metaphoric and visible. Translucent remains hover near the surface, as if a residue of this moment, a remnant of what is submerged within.
Julie Mehretu, A Mercy (after T. Morrison), 2019-2020

Ink and acrylic on canvas

96 x 120 in. (243.8 x 304.8 cm)

24534

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Julie Mehretu, Hineni II (E. 3:4), 2019-2020

Ink and acrylic on canvas

96 x 120 in. (243.8 x 304.8 cm

24533

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The latter, the underlying source materials that initiate the works, are furtive and dynamic, metamorphosizing into vulnerable but prophetic forms that activate the canvas’s ground to surface layers through time. In her intuitive calibration of these escalating strata, Mehretu employs multiple techniques to conjure ephemeral areas of imagination, liberation, haunting, mourning and rest, inviting the viewer to merge and interact in the experience
Julie Mehretu, Orient (after D. Cherry, post Irma and summer), 2017-2020

Ink and acrylic on canvas

108 x 120 in. (274.3 x 304.8 cm)

24532

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Julie Mehretu, Loop (B. Lozano, Bolsonaro eve), 2019-2020

Ink and acrylic on canvas

96 x 120 in. (243.8 x 304.8 cm)

24535

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Beginning with a photographic image as a point of departure, whose original is blurred and erased, Mehretu adds layer upon layer in a temporal process of screen print, ink, acrylic, and drawing, using paint, airbrush, sandpaper and erasure to realize and respond to the potential of an image. Implicit is our invitation to participate as witnesses to evidence and catastrophes of our time, to conceive of new possibilities. Alluding to the mediation of reality that mutates in and perpetrates our collective consciousness, each canvas resonates with subjects, from a flickering of events moving across our psychological screens, to migration, dispossession, and global phenomena. These volatile truths channel the imagination, revealing a piercing engagement through digital abstraction, which provides a space for investigation, autonomy, and invention. Other images abound, portals to memory and history, as well as potentialities of other paths forward.
Julie Mehretu, Slouching Towards Bethlehem: Second Seal (R 6:3), 2020

Photogravure, aquatint

Print: 66 7/8 x 81 7/8 in. (169.9 x 208 cm) / Frame: 72 1/4 x 88 x 2 1/2 in. (183.5 x 223.5 x 6.3 cm)

Edition of 18 plus 3 artist's proofs (#2/18), (S/24537)

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"The group of monumental paintings on view in the North Gallery Viewing Room, which continue into the South Gallery, was created over the past two years and coincided with the most recent work in Mehretu’scurrent retrospective. Sweeping in scale, they contain a dynamic choreography of movement and swaths of pulsating color, evoking arenas of cataclysmic events. Subliminal subjects subconsciously call to mind a present trauma. Proliferating below the surface, they erupt in a riot of hues that are both exuberant and menacing. From the migration crisis, to global warming and California wildfires; ecological havoc and Hurricane Irma; from Charlottesville and the rise of the right in international politics, to incongruous celebrations of fascism and cultural ruin, Mehretu’s work is fueled by social concerns of our moment. Reaching beyond the present, her references range from the historic and literary to the biblical, as in the systemic maelstrom of mechanized urban space and uprising in Orient (after D Cherry, post Irma and summer); the summoning of light against sutured black shadows in A Mercy (after T.Morrison); or the dystopian flames of Hineni II, a reference to the book of Genesis and to prayers of sacrifice and humility."
Julie Mehretu, Slouching Towards Bethlehem: First Seal (R 6:1), 2020

Photogravure, aquatint

Print: 66 7/8 x 81 7/8 in. (169.9 x 208 cm) / Frame: 72 1/4 x 88 x 2 1/2 in. (183.5 x 223.5 x 6.3 cm)

Edition of 18 plus 3 artist's proofs (#2/18) / (S/24536)

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In the Third Floor Viewing Room, Slouching Towards Bethlehem, a suite of four new etchings from 2020, will be shown for the first time. Ambitious in scale beyond the confines of traditional printmaking, they display the visual complexity of her recent practice, containing gestures, marks, glyphs and depth of color reminiscent of her paintings. Published by Niels Borch Jensen, these works reiterate the parity between drawing, painting and print making as of the utmost importance to the artist.
Julie Mehretu, Slouching Towards Bethlehem: Third Seal (R 6:5), 2020

Photogravure and aquatint

Print: 66 7/8 x 81 7/8 in. (169.9 x 208 cm) / Frame: 72 1/4 x 88 x 2 1/2 in. (183.5 x 223.5 x 6.3 cm)

Edition of 18 plus 3 artist's proofs (#2/18) / (S/24536)

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Mehretu’s touring retrospective which has recently opened at The High Museum, Atlanta, is in its second venue following the inaugural exhibition at LACMA, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California, which opened in November 2019. It will remain on view in Atlanta through January 31, 2021. A major catalogue was published by Prestel in 2019 to accompany the exhibition. The retrospective will also travel to The Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, opening in March 2021, and to The Walker Museum of Art, Minneapolis. Julie Mehretu’s work has been exhibited extensively in museums and biennials including at the Carnegie International (2004–05), Sydney Biennial (2006), Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York (2010), dOCUMENTA (13) (2012), Sharjah Biennial (2015), Museu de Arte Contemporânea de Serralves, Porto, Portugal (2017), Kettle's Yard, University of Cambridge, UK (2019); and the 58th International Art Exhibition, La Biennale di Venezia (2019).
Julie Mehretu, Slouching Towards Bethlehem: Fourth Seal (R 6:7), 2020

Photogravure and aquatint

Print: 66 7/8 x 81 7/8 in. (169.9 x 208 cm) / Frame: 72 1/4 x 88 x 2 1/2 in. (183.5 x 223.5 x 6.3 cm)

Edition of 18 plus 3 artist's proofs (#2/18) / (S/24536)

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Named recently as one of the 100 most influential people of 2020 by Time Magazine, Julie Mehretu, (b. 1970, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia) lives and works in New York City. She received a B.A. from Kalamazoo College, Michigan, studied at the University Cheik Anta Diop, Dakar Senegal, and received a Master’s of Fine Art with honors from The Rhode Island School of Design in 1997. She has since received many prestigious awards including the MacArthur Fellowship in 2005, the U.S. Department of State Medal of Arts Award in 2015, and the Liberty Award for Artistic Leadership, New York in 2018. In 2017, she was elected to the American Academy of Arts & Letters.
Julie Mehretu, Rise (Charlottesville), 2018-2019

Ink and acrylic on canvas

96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm)

24523

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Julie Mehretu, Maahes (Mihos) torch, 2018-2019

Ink and acrylic on canvas

96 x 72 in. (243.8 x 182.9 cm)

24522

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We invite you to visit the exhibition about the space of half an hour which will be on view from November 2 onwards. Visitors are able to view the exhibition by appointment, which can be scheduled on our website. For further information, please refer to our website at mariangoodman.com or call the Gallery at 212 977 7160.

Hollis Taggart

Hollis Taggart-formerly known as Hollis Taggart Galleries-was founded in 1979, with a mission to present museum-quality works of art, maintain a program motivated by scholarship, and offer personalized support in all aspects of art collecting. For nearly 40 years, the gallery has offered significant works of American art-showcasing the trajectory of American art movements from the Hudson River School to American Modernism and Post-War and Contemporary eras-and curated countless critically acclaimed shows in collaboration with the foremost leaders in the field. Hollis Taggart has also worked with more than thirty museums and institutions to produce scholarly catalogues.

"Hollis Heichemer"

Artist: Hollis Heichemer

Hollis Heichemer’s paintings capture transcendent experiences with nature, encounters which are fleeting, transformative and unexpected.

Hollis Heichemer, wind changes, 2020

Oil on Mylar mounted on board

24 x 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

Sold out

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Hollis Heichemer, north view, 2020

Oil on Mylar mounted on board

18 x 18 inches (45.7 x 45.7 cm)

5000

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Hollis Heichemer’s paintings capture transcendent experiences with nature, encounters which are fleeting, transformative and unexpected. Heichemer often runs through the New Hampshire woods surrounding her studio and returns with memories of what she describes as ridiculously beautiful moments, which she expresses intuitively in paint.
Hollis Heichemer, outer edge, 2020

Oil on Mylar mounted on board

20 x 20 inches (50.8 x 50.8 cm)

5000

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Hollis Heichemer, game at sunset, 2020

Oil on Mylar mounted on board

24 x 24 inches (61 x 61 cm)

On Hold

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HAttuned to changes in seasons and environment, in the rhythms of the natural world she finds something greater than ourselves. Hollis Heichemer was born in Binghamton, New York in 1963 and lives and works in New Hampshire. Her work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at Gross McCleaf Gallery and Rosenfeld Gallery in Philadelphia and both Hollis Taggart and J. Cacciola Gallery in New York.
Hollis Heichemer, short afternoon walk, 2020

Oil on Mylar mounted on board

20 x 20 inches (50.8 x 50.8 cm)

5000

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Hollis Heichemer, morning mist, 2020

Oil on Mylar mounted on board

18 x 18 inches (45.7 x 45.7 cm)

5000

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She’s participated in a wide range of group exhibitions, including most recently at Stanek Gallery in Philadelphia and Dolby Chadwick Gallery in San Francisco. She received her BS from the Ohio University and her MA at Seton Hall University.

Jack Shainman Gallery

Jack Shainman Gallery has been dedicated from its inception to championing artists who have achieved mastery of their creative disciplines and are among the most compelling and influential contributors to culture today. For nearly four decades, the Gallery has earned a reputation for introducing international artists to American audiences, and for promoting and developing young and mid-career artists who have gone on to gain worldwide acclaim, presenting the first New York exhibitions of artists including Nick Cave, Hayv Kahraman, Meleko Mokgosi, Richard Mosse, Toyin Ojih Odutola, Hank Willis Thomas, and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye, among many others. Today, Jack Shainman Gallery is celebrated for its multicultural roster of emerging and established artists and estates who engage in the social and cultural issues of their time.

"Nina Chanel Abney: The Great Escape"

Artist: Nina Chanel Abney

Jack Shainman Gallery is pleased to announce Nina Chanel Abney’s second solo exhibition at the gallery, which will be held in both our 513 West 20th Street and 524 West 24th Street galleries. The Great Escape explores the concept of a communal Arcadia, created for us, by us.

Nina Chanel Abney, Installation Photo, 2020

acrylic and spray paint on canvas

n/a

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Is there space for Black autonomy in a world organized by white supremacy? If it were an actual place – a space absent of race relations, antagonistic or friendly – what would it look like? This series responds to these questions by reimagining Black people's relationship to nature, property, and each other.
Nina Chanel Abney, Installation Photo, 2020

acrylic and spray paint on canvas

n/a

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Taking inspiration from the fugitive utopias of Black queer social life, these scenes refuse the enclosure of Blackness to topographies of the city and to ideals of heteronormativity. Instead, communal living in rural, wooded outdoors figures as a place for the performance of a Black autonomy that evades the ballistic force of the white gaze.
Nina Chanel Abney, Installation Photo, 2020

acrylic and spray paint on canvas

n/a

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Nina Chanel Abney, Installation Photo, 2020

acrylic and spray paint on canvas

n/a

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The art historical association of pastoral landscapes with whiteness is fraught; the deep history of expropriation, disenfranchisement, and value extraction that Black people have endured in relation to land requires us to interrogate white supremacist concepts of "belonging" as both property and propriety. Taking this terroristic history of white appropriation into account, these paintings propose idyllic scenes of Blackness steeped in care, cultivation, and collective leisure as a figuration of refuge and radical reparation.

Tina Kim Gallery

Founded in New York in 2001 by Tina Kim and located in Chelsea, Tina Kim Gallery is celebrated for its unique programming that emphasizes international contemporary artists, historical overviews, and independently curated shows. With the gallery’s strong focus on Asian contemporary artists, Tina Kim has become a leading figure in introducing the Korean Dansaekwha art movement to the American audience. Furthermore, she has created a platform for emerging and renowned artists such as Lee Seung Jio, Kim Tschang-Yeul, Minouk Lim, and Suki Seokyeong Kang. Through its programming, the gallery works closely with internationally renowned curators for special exhibitions and produces scholarly art publications.

"Tina Kim Gallery Presents: Art Without Borders"

Artist: Ghada Amer, Davide Balliano, Ha Chong-Hyun, Suki Seokyeong Kang, Park Seo-bo, Kim Tschang-Yeul, Kim Yong-Ik, Kwon Young-Woo and Lee Seung Jio

Tina Kim Gallery Presents: Art Without Borders began in Spring 2020 in response to COVID-19 pandemic, a global crisis spanning across cultures and borders. It has never been more important to find ways to stay connected and raise awareness for the most vulnerable.

We have partnered with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) to raise funds for their COVID-19 response. In over 70 countries, MSF teams have been responding to the pandemic on multiple fronts—caring for patients, offering health education and mental health support, and providing training for vital infection control measures in health facilities.

Ha Chong-Hyun (b. 1935), Conjunction 19-32, 2019

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Kwon Young-Woo (1926 - 2013), Untitled, 1986

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Tina Kim Gallery Presents: Art Without Borders began in Spring 2020 in response to COVID-19 pandemic, a global crisis spanning across cultures and borders. It has never been more important to find ways to stay connected and raise awareness for the most vulnerable. We have partnered with Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) to raise funds for their COVID-19 response. In over 70 countries, MSF teams have been responding to the pandemic on multiple fronts—caring for patients, offering health education and mental health support, and providing training for vital infection control measures in health facilities.
Park Seo-Bo, Ecriture No. 990127, 1999

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Kim Tschang-Yeul (b. 1929), Water drops, 1980

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Tina Kim Gallery Presents: Art Without Borders in collaboration with our generous artists: Ghada Amer, Davide Balliano, Ha Chong-Hyun, Suki Seokyeong Kang, Park Seo-bo, Kim Tschang-Yeul, Kim Yong-Ik, Kwon Young-Woo and Lee Seung Jio. These artists have donated images of their work to be produced on beautiful, collectable, limited edition tea towels (editions of 100). All the net proceeds from this sale will be donated to Doctors Without Borders.
Kibong Rhee (b. 1957), Lost Hill, 2020

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Kibong Rhee (b. 1957), Every dawn, 2020

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Ghada Amer (b. 1963), Study for the Red Portrait, 2017

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Ghada Amer (b. 1963), The Hunter-RFGA, 2020

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Davide Balliano (b. 1983), UNTITLED_0153, 2019

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Suki Seokyeong Kang (b.1977), Mat 55 X 40 #19-37, 2018-2019

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Suki Seokyeong Kang (b.1977), Narrow Meadow #19-10, 2018-2019

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Suki Seokyeong Kang (b. 1977), Narrow Meadow #19-14, 2018-19

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Davide Balliano, Untitled (Based On Untitled_0035, 2016), 2020

Digital print on tea towel, 100% cotton

27.56 x 19.69 inches, 70 x 50 cm

Edition of 100

$100

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Kim Yong-Ik (b. 1947), Untitled, 1990-2012

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Kwon Young-Woo (1926 - 2013), Untitled (based on Untitled, 1985), 2020

Digital print on tea towel, 100% cotton

27.56 x 19.69 inches / 70 x 50 cm

Edition of 100

$100

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Suki Seokyeong Kang (b.1977), Untitled (Based on Mat Black Mat 122 x 163 #19-02, 2019), 2020

Digital print on tea towel, 100% cotton

27.56 x 19.69 inches/ 70 x 50 cm

Edition of 100

$100

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Kim Yong-Ik (b. 1947), Untitled (based on Untitled, 1990-2012), 2020

Digital print on tea towel, 100% cotton

27.56 x 19.69 inches/ 70 x 50 cm

Edition of 100

$100

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Kim Tschang-Yeul (b. 1929), Untitled (based on Water drops, 2014), 2020

Limited edition artist print on high-quality cotton

19 7/10 × 27 3/5 in, 50 × 70 cm

Edition of 100

$100

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Park Seo-Bo (b. 1931), Untitled, (based on Ecriture No. 990127, 1999), 2020

Limited edition artist print on high-quality cotton

19 7/10 × 27 3/5 in, 50 × 70 cm

Edition of 100

$100

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Lee Seung Jio (1941-1990), Untitled (based on Nucleus 84-49, 1984), 2020

Limited edition artist print on high-quality cotton

19 7/10 × 27 3/5 in, 50 × 70 cm

Edition of 100

$100

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Ha Chong-Hyun (b. 1935), Untitled (based on Conjunction, 2019), 2020

Limited edition artist print on high-quality cotton

19 7/10 × 27 3/5 in, 50 × 70 cm

Edition of 100

$100

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Ghada Amer (b. 1963), Untitled (based on Sunset with Words - RFGA, 2013), 2020

Limited edition artist print on high-quality cotton

19 7/10 × 27 3/5 in, 50 × 70 cm

Edition of 100

$100

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To coincide with our fundraising effort, we are pleased to present a group exhibition featuring artists who generously participated in the campaign alongside their respective prints. This exhibition celebrates the artists and communities who have supported this project.
Each individual edition is priced at $100; however, a limited number of full sets (all 9 prints) can be purchased at a discounted price of $800.

Mitchell-innes & Nash

Founded by Lucy Mitchell-Innes and David Nash, who previously headed the worldwide Contemporary and Impressionist & Modern Art divisions of Sotheby’s, Mitchell-Innes & Nash places exemplary contemporary artists within a historical context, revealing a continuity of ideas and aesthetic virtuosity from the Modern era through the present day. Lucy Mitchell-Innes is also a member of the selection committee of Art Basel and a former president of the Art Dealers Association of America.

"A Show by Gideon Appah"

Artist: Gideon Appah

Mitchell-Innes & Nash is pleased to present its first solo presentation of Ghanaian artist, Gideon Appah (b. 1987) on view November 5 – December 5, 2020. In this new body of work, Appah expands on his mystical landscapes and dreamlike narratives in large-scale oil paintings that consider memory and tradition.

Gideon Appah, If We Had a Thousand Years, 2020

Oil and acrylic on canvas

Diptych, overall: 93 1/4 by 117 1/4 in. 236.9 by 297.8 cm.

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A mixed-media artist, Appah often draws from personal experiences to create works that are informed by life in Ghana’s capital of Accra, but this exhibition will mark a critical juncture in his practice that incorporates fictional and unknown places and people. In new otherworldly works, Appah’s compositional range is evident in both the city and domestic scenes that feature figures in positions of leisure as well as his depiction of ritual in areas where the land meets the sky.
Gideon Appah, Remember Our Stars, 2020

Oil and acrylic on canvas

78 by 78 in. 198.1 by 198.1 cm.

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Gideon Appah, Matilda, 2020

Oil and acrylic on canvas

46 7/8 by 39 1/4 in. 119.1 by 99.7 cm

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The compositions filled with reference to a city life of the past showcase architecture and fashion elements as well as smoking and car culture that nod to the 1970s and 1980s. Additionally, the surreal scenes of rural landscapes populated by unknown, indigenous people divorced from city influence are miraged with tropes from legend and myth. Here, he abandons the city scenes in order to consider what happens when the body cannot rely on other elements in the composition.
Gideon Appah, Rex, 2020

Oil and acrylic on canvas

78 by 77 7/8 in. 198.1 by 197.8 cm.

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Gideon Appah, Teen Smoking on an Imaginary Street, 2020

Oil and acrylic on canvas

78 1/4 by 58 1/2 in. 198.8 by 148.6 cm.

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Appah uses thick, rough applications of pigment to build up his compositions. His treatment of flesh or earth is as much about feeling a sense of texture as it is about pure abstraction in order to reflect on a country’s national history. His paintings imbue an acute technicality, using color and scale as important signifiers in his work. Through nostalgic blues and verdigris, his worlds are abstracted and fragmented, with glimpses of nature and ghostly reflections barely visible.
Gideon Appah, Most Precious, 2020

Oil and acrylic on canvas

47 1/16 by 39 5/16 in. 119.5 by 99.9 cm.

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Gideon Appah, Portrait of a Lover and His Concubine, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

50 7/8 by 50 7/8 in. 129.2 by 129.2 cm.

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He focuses on presence or feelings evoked within his ethereal works, whether through a figure’s confrontation with the viewer to invite them into the scene or a glimpse inside a sensual, private moment where joy or ecstasy is experienced. This in turn alludes to the organic transformations of memories over time.














Galerie Lelong & Co.Viewing Room
Jack Barrett Viewing Room
Simon Lee GalleryViewing Room
Asya Geisberg GalleryViewing Room
Metro PicturesViewing Room
Foley GalleryViewing Room
De Buck GalleryViewing Room
False Flag GalleryViewing Room
Patrick Parrish Gallery Viewing Room

Galerie Lelong & Co.

Galerie Lelong & Co. represents prominent contemporary artists and estates from the United States, Latin America, Europe, Asia, and Australia. This uniquely diverse group includes mid-career and established artists at the forefront of the international art world working across all media.

"Seasons"

Artist: Etel Adnan

Galerie Lelong & Co., New York, is pleased to present Etel Adnan: Seasons, our second solo exhibition with the artist. The exhibition will show recent works by the artist, including wool tapestries, leporellos, and paintings. Known for her distinctive abstract landscapes conveyed in a harmonious palette, Adnan’s portrayal of forms, shapes, and gestures are explored in multiple mediums.

A brilliant colorist, Adnan conceives her works as visual poems, each color carefully chosen in writing a language of her own. The exhibition coincides with the release of her newest book, Shifting the Silence, a rumination on the process of aging.

Etel Adnan, Planète 12, 2020

Oil on canvas

13 x 8.7 inches (33 x 22 cm)

Framed: 14.25 x 9.9 inches (36.2 x 25.1 cm), GL14744

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Etel Adnan, Clairiére, 2020

Oil on canvas

13 x 8.7 inches (33 x 22 cm)

Framed: 14.25 x 9.9 inches (36.2 x 25.1 cm), GL14744

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The exhibition takes its title from Adnan’s poem “Surge” (2017) which asks: “Why do seasons who regularly follow their appointed time, deny their kind of energy to us?“ The poem ends with “we deal with a permanent voyage, the becoming of that which itself had become.” Reading Adnan’s poetry, the recurring themes of nature vis-à-vis the passage of time demonstrate a contemplation of one’s journeys in physical and inner spaces. Adnan continues this mode of inquiry in her visual language, containing multitudes within each piece and making room for interpretation and exploration.
Etel Adnan, Planète 17, 2020

Oil on canvas

36.2x25.2cm 13x8.7 inches(33 x 22 cm)

Framed: 14.25 x 9.9 inches (36.2 x 25.1 cm), GL14746

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Etel Adnan, Planète 8, 2019

Oil on canvas

13 x 9.5 nches (33 x 24 cm)

Framed: 14.25 x 9.9 inches (36.2 x 25.2 cm), GL14747

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A highlight of Seasons is Planètes, her new body of paintings depicting planets. During the pause of her activities under quarantine, Adnan reflected on the current pandemic; turning her eye for the landscape upwards as e began painting imaginary planets and satellites in vibrant skies, a completely new subject for the artist whose oeuvre spans six decades.
Etel Adnan, Etel Adnan, 2020

Oil on canvas

Four parts, each: 13 x 8.7 inches (33 x 22 cm)

Framed, each: 14.4 x 9.8 inches (36.5 x 25 cm), GL14722

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Etel Adnan, Le temps passe, 2017

Ceramic

11 x 15.75 inches (28 x 40 cm)

Framed: 11.6 x 16.3 x .8 inches (29.5 x 41.5 x 2 cm), GL12672

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Etel Adnan, Au matin, 2017

Wool tapestry

56.3 x 78.75 inches (143 x 200 cm)

Edition of 3 with 1 AP GP2298

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Etel Adnan, Liberté, 2017-18

Wool tapestry

55.5 x 79.5 inches (141 x 202 cm)

Edition of 3 with 1 AP GP2297

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The Planètes series is conceived in a vertical format, with a consistent circle of color appearing in varied forms. In some works, the circle occupies and fills the composition lengthwise and in others, seems to be moving off the canvas, leaving a semi-circle. An element representing an object from our daily lives—a bicycle or an apple—grounds the composition.
Etel Adnan, Vignoble, 2018

Tapestry

59 x 72.7 inches( 150 x 185.1 cm )

Edition of 3 with 1 AP GP2377

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Etel Adnan, Clairiére, 2019

Wool tapestry

62.25 x 78.38 inches (158.1 x 199.1)

Edition of 3 with 1 AP GP2606

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In the early 1960s, Adnan discovered the mediums of wool tapestry and leporello. When her works were presented at Documenta 13 in 2012, the artist’s distinctive use of these materials was quickly established as key tenets of her practice. In the presentation, a lone mid-size tapestry was laid on a low table as a centrifugal anchor flanked by thirty-eight paintings. Inspired by her exposure to Persian carpets as a child, the artist had sought to realize her early designs over decades, engaging various international weavers before working with the historic Aubusson atelier PINTON. The unfolding of the leporellos included in the exhibition—accordion-folded booklets that reveal panoramic illustrations—immediately draws a kinship to Adnan’s literary practice and the act of reading. “I realized how much materials, for artists, are things that mediate thought… how much they become the elements of one’s expression, and instead of being just a support, they become in a way a co-author of one’s work,” writes Adnan.
Etel Adnan, L'Olivier, 2019

Wool tapestry

55.1 x 78.75 inches (140 x 200 cm)

Edition of 3 with 1 AP GP2662

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Upcoming museum exhibitions presenting works by Etel Adnan will be held at the Pera Museum, Istanbul, Turkey; Centro de Arte Contemporáneo C3A, Córdoba, Spain and the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
Etel Adnan, Matinée récréative, 1970/2015

Wool tapestry

72.8 x 65 inches (185 x 165 cm)

Edition of 3 with 1 AP GP2079

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Jack Barrett

Jack Barrett is New York City based art gallery specializing in contemporary art.

"Dylan Vandenhoeck"

Artist: Dylan Vandenhoeck

I stand in Dylan’s studio facing three paintings. On all three canvases, warped crystal ball landscapes sit enveloped in color.

On my left, a night time Manhattanscape hangs like a crystal necklace resting on dark velvet. Car lights beneath an overpass become jewels while a traffic light swings like a heavy treasure. In the corner of the painting, a silent scream of white mimics the kind of peripheral phenomena generated by moving my head in circles.

Dylan Vandenhoeck, Chiasm / Afterimages, 2018/19

Oil on Canvas

84 x 74 inches

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Dylan Vandenhoeck, Window / Hallway, 2019

Oil on Linen

78 x 44 inches

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I stand in Dylan’s studio facing three paintings. On all three canvases, warped crystal ball landscapes sit enveloped in color.
Dylan Vandenhoeck, Plein Air Palette, 2020

Oil on linen

66 x 41 inches

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Dylan Vandenhoeck, Plein Air/Pressure Phosphene, 2020

Oil over casein on linen

24 x 18 inches

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On my left, a night time Manhattanscape hangs like a crystal necklace resting on dark velvet. Car lights beneath an overpass become jewels while a traffic light swings like a heavy treasure. In the corner of the painting, a silent scream of white mimics the kind of peripheral phenomena generated by moving my head in circles.
Dylan Vandenhoeck, Window/Hallway, 2019

Oil on linen

78 x 44 inches

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Dylan Vandenhoeck, Mt. Kisco Walgreens, 2020

Oil on linen

66 x 41 inches

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In the next painting, a row of suburban buildings bend around a telephone pole like a peaceful car accident, dragging a behind-my-eyelids red in its wake. Much like the first painting, this scene is as much an inner landscape as an interpretation of a place. I keep glancing at the backlit houses because they look like the kind of image that will disappear when I look away, like a reflection on moving water.
Dylan Vandenhoeck, East Broadway, 2020

Oil on linen

66 x 41 inches

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Dylan Vandenhoeck, Co-op City, 2020

Oil on linen

66 x 41 inches

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When I ask Dylan what he hopes someone looking at his paintings might feel, he says, “Different layers of experience are strange and difficult to trace.”
Dylan Vandenhoeck, What’s a Crop?, 2020

Oil on linen

28 x 24 inches

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We don’t usually talk about what we see when we close our eyes and nod yes. It’s different every time, and so it makes sense that these different types of imagery—abstract, observed, remembered—fit together into one experiential image. I find myself accepting the combination, because I too remember what it’s like to close my eyes in a field, or to feel consumed by the night.
Dylan Vandenhoeck, Running in Waveny Park, 2020

Oil on linen

66 x 41 inches

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Dylan Vandenhoeck, Jumprope/Anxiety, 2020

Oil on linen

36 x 24 inches

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Dylan’s paintings propose an immersive, lived experience and ask me if I’m up for it.
Against the backdrop of a sociopolitical climate that is, as Dylan writes, “regressive on an existential level,” painting stands up for the notion of a “lived human experience” in the face of soundbites, echo-chambers, fake news, and our high-def, yet inarticulate, commander-in-chief.
I’m writing under COVID-19 quarantine—I am home, not sick, but not exactly well. Dylan’s paintings ask me to remember I am still whole, in my own skin, that I have memories, dreams, and reflections.
The paintings from the show remind me of running to the point of nausea, when exhaustion leads to a thought: you can articulate something without a name, but how? By being present in your experience. By participating in reality. By allowing an experience to change you.
See how vast and colorful my response is to his paintings. Yours probably is too. When I ask Dylan what he wants from a viewer, he says, “I would hope they would turn away and notice their own version of this.” There’s a sense of communion to his answer that echoes the way his body and vision seem to melt together in these paintings. I’m struck not by the intimacy, but by the type of intimacy. It’s athletic.
I’m writing under COVID-19 quarantine—I am home, not sick, but not exactly well. Dylan’s paintings ask me to remember I am still whole, in my own skin, that I have memories, dreams, and reflections.
The paintings from the show remind me of running to the point of nausea, when exhaustion leads to a thought: you can articulate something without a name, but how? By being present in your experience. By participating in reality. By allowing an experience to change you.
- Sarah Esme Harrison

Simon Lee Gallery

Simon Lee Gallery is an international art gallery representing over 35 established and emerging contemporary artists and estates.

"Pedestrian Profanities, Curated by Eric N. Mack"

Artist: Susan Cianciolo, Abigail Deville, Samuel Hindolo, Andy Robert, Cinzia Ruggeri, Section 8, Torey Thornton, Kandis Williams

Simon Lee Gallery, New York is pleased to present Pedestrian Profanities, a group exhibition of interdisciplinary artists, designers and polymaths curated by Eric N. Mack, which explores the relationship between fine art, design and fashion, and the ways in which they are activated by a participating body.

Susan Cianciolo, Two Maroon Women Watercolor on Brown Paper, 2001

Watercolor on Brown Paper

45.7 x 61 cm (18 x 24 in.)

Courtesy of the artist and Bridget Donahue, New York

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Simon Lee Gallery, New York is pleased to present Pedestrian Profanities, a group exhibition of interdisciplinary artists, designers and polymaths curated by Eric N. Mack, which explores the relationship between fine art, design and fashion, and the ways in which they are activated by a participating body.
Susan Cianciolo, Sunburst Kit / Doll In Part, 2004-2015

Cotton doll parts, knit batten, crochet hat from 2004 wedding collection, cardboard, watercolor on paper, magazine tearsheets, tape, digital prints, collage from 'Angels Do Exist' and Purple Magazine photos on quilt

26.7 x 137.2 x 94 cm (10 1/2 x 54 1/8 x 37 1/8 in.)

Courtesy of the artist and Bridget Donahue, New York, Photo: Leif Anderson

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The role of a mannequin in a storefront is to elicit a direct relationship between the consumer, their body and the garment; to engender a sense of its structure. In a similar way, the role of the viewer in the act of observing, or consuming, an artwork bestows value and radiant spirit: the art object, at its most sacred, should reflect altered systems of value, especially in observation of our world's brutalities. In contemplating either artwork or clothing, the viewer enacts a sense of embodiment outside of their-self – an act of transference.
Andy Robert, Smoking Gun, 2017

Oil and pencil on canvas

208.3 x 188 cm (82 1/8 x 74 1/8 in.)

Courtesy of the artist, Hannah Hoffman, Los Angeles and Greene Naftali, New York

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This exhibition imagines a case for the painted object to flee its support structures and need the body. To cling to the body, worn as smuggled modernity.' -Eric N. Mack
Kandis Williamsco, response-ability with/for the unknown Other, 2019-20

Xerox collage and ink on paper, framed

106.7 x 132.6 cm (42 1/8 x 52 1/4 in.)

Courtesy of the artist and Essex Street / Maxwell Graham

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In Mack’s own immersive practice, the artist reconciles non-traditional attitudes to painting with architectural nuance, directly negotiating the disjoin between art and fashion, and investigating the ways in which each discipline intersects with and informs the other. Drawing on his own aesthetic conceptions, in Pedestrian Profanities Mack brings together a group of artists and designers that likewise grapple with notions of use and commodity value in their practices, interrogating consumption in the process, as well as questioning the ways in which aesthetics live with the body.
Torey Thornton, Resting Halt (naked), 2019

Acrylic medium and galvanized steel mending plates on wooden butcher block

142.9 x 142.2 cm (56 1/4 x 56 in.)

Courtesy of the artist and Night Gallery, Los Angeles

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In common with Mack, each artist in this exhibition bridges the divide between performance, art, architecture and fashion, bypassing traditional function in favor of psychological connection, emotional communication and formal innovation. In the work of Cinzia Ruggeri, a surrealist sensibility transforms the viewer’s experience of embodied space; her interactive practice, and in particular her fashion design of the 1980s, invites us to reconsider our position in the world. Similarly, Susan Cianciolo’s collage and textile-based practice reflects on her experiences operating as a designer outside of the mainstream fashion industry, which she turned on its head with a holistic approach to a range of creative projects. Made with found materials, Torey Thornton’s mixed media abstractions gather a myriad of materials with personal associations for the artist. Volume and texture are central facets of their process, which, like Mack’s work, straddles the boundary between painting and sculpture.
Kandis Williams, Iconic face of Death Mask II, 2018

Vinyl print on plexi

76.2 x 138.4 cm (30 x 54 in.)

Courtesy of the artist and Night Gallery, Los Angeles

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Both Abigail DeVille and Samuel Hindolo engage with forgotten or unknown histories. DeVille’s site- specific works are constructed from a tapestry of found objects that intrinsically connect the art object to its site of exhibition. Exploring material culture, the artist is fundamentally concerned with reclaiming the abandoned, overlooked and making the invisible visible. By contrast, Hindolo’s work is figurative yet fictive, constructing scenes from the artist’s own image archive that are nonetheless equally absorbed in the illumination of peripheral or misunderstood figures. Kandis Williams’ collages confront issues of race, representation and the lived experience of the human body. Like in DeVille’s work, the dense layering of content in works such as co-response-ability with/for the unknown Other, 2019-20, is haptic and expressive, while bringing structure to complex themes.
Cinzia Ruggeri, Multicolor, 2019

Leather

13 x 20 x 13 cm (5 1/8 x 7 7/8 x 5 1/8 in.)

Courtesy Archivio Cinzia Ruggeri and Galleria Federico Vavassori, Milan, Photo: Alessandro Zambianchi

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Working predominately as a stylist and creative director, Akeem Smith, founder of clothing label SECTION 8, has been a key figure in defining fashion’s underground through his use of cross-cultural references and striking imagery, which seeks to smash gender and beauty ideals. His deeply personal approach investigates the slippages between memory, archive, and history, and, in turn, the weight of visibility and representation, and lately his creative language has found new forms of expression: ‘I’ve found there are a lot of limitations with styling and designing, but when creating what I would consider a sculpture, there is much more freedom.’
Like many of the artists in this exhibition, painter Andy Robert has a deeply personal and experimental approach to his medium. Working on the edge of representation, photographs of people and places he sees in Harlem every day, are taken apart and put back together again through the expressive and experimental possibilities of paint. His approach to painting negotiates how a contemporary image is made, understood and seen – its contextualization. His paintings and works on paper reflect private and public conversations, a sense of community and isolation, and above all absorb voice, narrative and witness of life in the metropolis.

Asya Geisberg Gallery

Asya Geisberg Gallery presents a visually eclectic and conceptually focused program of thought-provoking contemporary art. AGG showcases art that manages to stand out and translate across multiple arenas of discourse, art history, and culture.

"The Art of Labor"

Artist: Rodrigo Valenzuela

Rodrigo Valenzuela works across photography, video, and installation, merging his interest in art history, architecture, the concept of work, and the realities of laborers. Valenzuela builds scenes in his studio, often working with simple building materials such as cinder blocks, pipes, wooden palettes, corrugated metal, and two-by-fours. The resulting monochrome photographs constantly shift between flatness and architectural space, and between documentary photography and fiction, encouraging an incessant yet pleasurable tension.

26 E 64th St 2nd floor, New York, NY 10065, United States

Rodrigo Valenzuela, Hedonic Reversal No. 8, 2014

archival pigment print, artist frame

54 x 44 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Toward Hedonic Reversal No. 5, 2014

archival pigment print, artist frame

54 x 44 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela works across photography, video, and installation, merging his interest in art history, architecture, the concept of work, and the realities of laborers. Valenzuela builds scenes in his studio, often working with simple building materials such as cinder blocks, pipes, wooden palettes, corrugated metal, and two-by-fours. The resulting monochrome photographs constantly shift between flatness and architectural space, and between documentary photography and fiction, encouraging an incessant yet pleasurable tension. His compositions resemble miniature ruins built from studio detritus, and are documentative of the artist's performance in the studio. Simultaneously, they clearly reference certain Modernist masters - be it Abstract-Expressionist painters or Minimalist sculptors - as well as Latin-American Brutalist architecture.
Rodrigo Valenzuela, Hedonic Reversal No. 6, 2014

archival pigment print, artist frame

54 x 44 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Hedonic Reversal No. 12, 2014

archival pigment print, artist frame

54 x 44 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Valenzuela's interest in the political history and capitalism of construction is evident in the way he reuses and remixes objects before the camera. In Stature, his exhibition at Asya Geisberg Gallery, discarded consumer packaging is cast in concrete to create sculptures that could be Brutalist buildings or small abstract forms, elegant objets d’art or perhaps monuments to oppressive political regimes. Whether in “classic” black and white, low-contrast grey, or sepia works in the series Hedonic Reversal (2014), Barricade (2017), American Type (2018), and Stature (2020), Valenzuela consistently generates his own photographic vocabulary to present visually ambiguous images that resist easy categorization.
Rodrigo Valenzuela, Hedonic Reversal No. 15, 2014

archival pigment print, artist frame

54 x 44 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Hedonic Reversal No. 16, 2014

archival pigment print, artist frame

54 x 44 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Barricade No. 6, 2017

Archival pigment print mounted on Dibond

55 x 45 inches

Edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Barricade No. 3, 2017

Archival pigment print mounted on Dibond

55 x 45 inches

Edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Images from left to right: Barricade No. 4, Barricade No. 5, 2017

archival pigment print mounted on Dibond

55 x 45 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Images from left to right: American-type #9, American-type #8, American-type #6, 2017

archival pigment print mounted on Dibond,

55 x 45 inches

edition of 3 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, American-type #13, 2018

Archival pigment print

54" x 44", edition of 3 plus 1 AP

44" x 36", 1 plus 1 AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela (b. 1982 in Chile) lives and works in Los Angeles. He completed an art history degree at the University of Chile (2004), then worked in construction while making art over his first decade in the United States, completing a BA in Philosophy at Evergreen College (2010) and an MFA at the University of Washington (2012). Currently, Valenzuela is an assistant professor in the Department of Art at the UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture.
Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 1, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 3, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 4, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 5, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 6, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 7, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 8, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Rodrigo Valenzuela, Stature No. 10, 2020

Photogravure

31" x 35.25"

Edition of 8 plus 2AP

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Metro Pictures

Metro Pictures was founded in 1980 by Janelle Reiring, formerly of Leo Castelli Gallery, and Helene Winer, formerly of Artists Space, at 169 Mercer Street in New York.

"Cindy Sherman"

Artist: Cindy Sherman

For her latest body of work, Cindy Sherman has transformed herself into an extraordinary cast of androgynous characters, expanding her career-long investigation into the construction of identity and the nature of representation. The enigmatic figures pictured in the ten new photographs on view are dressed primarily in men’s designer clothing and are posed gallantly in front of digitally manipulated backgrounds composed from photographs Sherman took while traveling through Bavaria, Shanghai, and Sissinghurst (England). Each character draws the viewer in with their unique style, immediate eye contact and steely gaze.

Renowned for her depictions of female stereotypes, Sherman has played with masculinity and gender expression before. In a series referred to as "Doctor and Nurse,” Sherman became both a male and female character, embodying stereotypical mid-century professional archetypes. In the “History Portrait” series, Sherman became both male aristocrats and clergymen. In her more recent clown series, the artist donned layers of face paint and shapeless costumes, eliminating the question of gender for many of the characters.

Cindy Sherman, Untitled #609, 2019

Dye sublimation print

62 1/2 x 91 1/4 inches (158.8 x 231.8 cm).

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled #610, 2019

Dye sublimation print

74 1/2 x 90 inches (189.2 x 228.6 cm).

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For her latest body of work, Cindy Sherman has transformed herself into an extraordinary cast of androgynous characters, expanding her career-long investigation into the construction of identity and the nature of representation. The enigmatic figures pictured in the ten new photographs on view are dressed primarily in men’s designer clothing and are posed gallantly in front of digitally manipulated backgrounds composed from photographs Sherman took while traveling through Bavaria, Shanghai, and Sissinghurst (England). Each character draws the viewer in with their unique style, immediate eye contact and steely gaze.
Cindy Sherman, Untitled #611, 2019

Dye sublimation print, 91 x 107 1/4 inches (231.1 x 272.4 cm

1 x 107 1/4 inches (231.1 x 272.4 cm)

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled #612, 2019

Dye sublimation print66 x 100 inches (167.6 x 254 cm)

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled #613, 2019

Dye sublimation print

79 1/4 x 101 3/4 inches (201.3 x 258.4 cm)

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled #614, 2019

Dye sublimation print

91 x 91 inches (231.1 x 231.1 cm)

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Renowned for her depictions of female stereotypes, Sherman has played with masculinity and gender expression before. In a series referred to as "Doctor and Nurse,” Sherman became both a male and female character, embodying stereotypical mid-century professional archetypes. In the “History Portrait” series, Sherman became both male aristocrats and clergymen. In her more recent clown series, the artist donned layers of face paint and shapeless costumes, eliminating the question of gender for many of the characters.
Cindy Sherman, Untitled #615, 2019

Dye sublimation print

91 x 91 inches (231.1 x 231.1 cm)

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled #618, 2019

Dye sublimation print

68 1/2 x 82 1/2 inches (174 x 209.6 cm)

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled #602, 2019

Dye sublimation print, 76 1/4 x 87 1/2 inches (193.7 x 222.3 cm)

76 1/4 x 87 1/2 inches (193.7 x 222.3 cm)

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Cindy Sherman, Untitled #603, 2019

Dye sublimation print

84 3/4 x 77 inches (215.3 x 195.6 cm)

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One of the most influential artists of her generation, Cindy Sherman is currently the subject of a one-person exhibition at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris that runs from September 23 through January 3, 2021, following major retrospective exhibitions in 2019 at the National Portrait Gallery, London, and the Vancouver Art Gallery. Her 2012 retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, traveled to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; and the Dallas Museum of Art. Additional recent exhibitions include Fosun Foundation, Shanghai; the inaugural exhibition at the Broad Museum, Los Angeles; Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, Australia; and Astrup Fearnley Museum, Oslo. Sherman has participated in four Venice Biennales, co-curating a section at the 55th exhibition in 2013. Her work has been included in five iterations of the Whitney Biennial, two Biennales of Sydney, and the 1983 Documenta. She is the recipient of the 2020 Wolf Prize in Arts and has also been awarded the Praemium Imperiale, an American Academy of Arts and Letters Award, and a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship.

Foley Gallery

FOLEY brings together fine line and obsessive precision in the disciplines of drawing, cut paper, painting, and photography. Michael Foley opened Foley Gallery in the fall of 2004 after several years of working with notable photography galleries including Fraenkel Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Yancey Richardson Gallery.

"Foley Windows October & November 2020"

Artist: Alexis Duque ,Deborah Simon,Peter Callesen, Evri Kwong ,Rosalind Solomon, Thomas Allen, Stan Squirewell, Chrissy Angliker, Joana Ricou, Weronika Gęsicka, Alexandre Orion, Thomas Allen, Martin Klimas, Wyatt Gallery

Group Show

Alexis Duque , Dwelling, 2018

Cardboard, modeling paste, ink and acrylic paint

20h x 10w x 10d in

$ 4,000.00

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FOLEY brings together fine line and obsessive precision in the disciplines of drawing, cut paper, painting, and photography.
Alexis Duque , Tower, 2017

Cardboard, modeling paste, ink and acrylic paint

24h x 9w x 9d in

$ 4,000.00

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Alexis Duque, Monolith, 2015

Polystyrene foam, resin, ink and acrylic paint

13h x 5w x 5d in

$ 1,800.00

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Michael Foley opened Foley Gallery in the fall of 2004 after several years of working with notable photography galleries including Fraenkel Gallery, Howard Greenberg Gallery, and Yancey Richardson Gallery.
Deborah Simon , Flayed Rabbit: Albino with Cells, 2018

polymer clay, faux fur, linen, embroidery floss, acrylic paint, glass, wire and foam

26h x 10w x 8d in

$ 3,900.00

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Deborah Simon , Flayed Rabbit: Albino with Nerves, 2017

polymer clay, faux fur, linen, embroidery floss, acrylic paint, glass, wire and foam

26h x 10w x 9d in

$ 3,900.00

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Michael Foley was born in Delaware and grew up in Croton-on-Hudson, New York. He opened his gallery in the fall of 2004 after fourteen years of working with notable photography galleries including Fraenkel, Howard Greenberg and Yancey Richardson.
Peter Callesen , Untitled (Falling Skeleton), 2013

Acid-free A4 160 gsm paper, glue, acrylic paint and coloured oak frame

19h x 14.50w in

$ 5,200.00

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Evri Kwong , Mom's at it again, 1996

Ink and Watercolor

12h x 8w in

$ 1,500.00

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Photography has been a passion since his high school days as a staff yearbook photographer. His personal art making practice is equally inspired by collage, cut paper and painting. In 2006, he brought artists within theses disciplines to the list of exhibiting gallery artists.
Rosalind Solomon , An East Village Painter, 1986

Gelatin Silver Print

20h x 16w in

$ 6,000.00

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Thomas Allen , NT567 (SHIPWRECK), 2015

Chromogenic Print

10h x 8w in

Edition of 10

$ 2,000.00

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Foley went on to co-found The Exhibition Lab in the fall of 2009. The Ex Lab is a study center for people involved in various aspects of fine art photography.
Stan Squirewell , Contemplation of Desdemona, 2020

Mixed media collage & shou sugi ban carved frame

21h x 17w in

$ 3,800.00

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Chrissy Angliker , Little Threes, 2019

Acrylic on Canvas

20h x 16w in

$ 3,500.00

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Joana Ricou , One, No One and One Hundred Thousand No. 30, 2019

Mixed Media on Wood

8h x 8w x 2d in

$ 450.00

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Weronika Gęsicka, Untitled #56, 2015-2018

Archival Pigment Print

12.60h x 15.75w in

Edition 2 of 5

$ 2,500.00

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Alexandre Orion , Metabiotica 16, 2004

Chromogenic Print

20.50h x 30w in

$ 2,300.00

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Thomas Allen , Terror, 2004

Chromogenic Print

20h x 24w in

Edition 5 of 15

$ 2,500.00

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Martin Klimas , Untitled, 2013

Pigment Print

35h x 28w in

Edition of 5

$3,800 + $550 Frame

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Wyatt Gallery , W4TH: 016.8 8, 2017

UV Cured Pigment Ink on Dibond

24h x 103w in

Edition of 5

$9,500

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Foley continues his interest in educating by serving on the faculty of the School of Visual Arts and the International Center of Photography where he teaches and lectures on issues in contemporary photography.

De Buck Gallery

Founded in 2011 by international art dealer, David De Buck, De Buck Gallery focuses on contemporary artists, from emerging to mid career, and is deeply committed to innovative artists’ projects and exhibitions. De Buck presents artists who are art scene leaders across their disciplines with a strong curatorial following and critical acclaim. The gallery programming engages contemporary talent such as Rashaad Newsome, Devan Shimoyama, Stephen Towns, Sharif Bey and Juan Garaizabal. Shows such as “Sweet” (2017) by Devan Shimoyama demonstrate the gallery’s cutting-edge and cross-disciplinary approach with dynamic new multi-media programming and performance.

"A Songbook Remembered"

Artist: Stephen Towns

NEW YORK—De Buck Gallery is pleased to announce A Songbook Remembered, Stephen Towns’ second solo exhibition with the gallery. A Songbook Remembered will feature a collection of new quilt work and will be on display at 507 West 27th Street from October 15th to November 28th, as well as in De Buck’s virtual viewing room from October 22nd, as part of the gallery’s digital programming.

Ancestral music is at the heart of Towns’ new work, a quilted collection of imagined historical narratives with imagery drawn directly from the poetry of African American spirituals. This powerful work represents a deeply personal and emotional evolution within Towns’ quilting practice, as he turned to both spiritual music and back to the process of quilting as acts of comfort during the uncertainty of COVID-19. Towns’ intricate stitch work is guided by songs of joy, hope, resilience, and protest and the creative process itself functioned, for the artist, as an act of remaining present in a time of chaos.

Stephen Towns, Deep River, 2020

Natural and synthetic fabric, Available polyester and cotton thread, crystal glass beads, cowrie shells

SIZE (CM):99.1 x 132.2 cmSIZE (IN):39 x 48.5 in

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NEW YORK—De Buck Gallery is pleased to announce A Songbook Remembered, Stephen Towns’ second solo exhibition with the gallery. A Songbook Remembered will feature a collection of new quilt work and will be on display at 507 West 27th Street from October 15th to November 28th, as well as in De Buck’s virtual viewing room from October 22nd, as part of the gallery’s digital programming.
Stephen Towns, Crucifixion, 2020

Natural and synthetic fabric, polyester and cotton thread, crystal glass and resin beads, resin buttons.

SIZE (CM):102.2 x 118.7 cmSIZE (IN):40.25 x 46.75 in

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Ancestral music is at the heart of Towns’ new work, a quilted collection of imagined historical narratives with imagery drawn directly from the poetry of African American spirituals. This powerful work represents a deeply personal and emotional evolution within Towns’ quilting practice, as he turned to both spiritual music and back to the process of quilting as acts of comfort during the uncertainty of COVID-19. Towns’ intricate stitch work is guided by songs of joy, hope, resilience, and protest and the creative process itself functioned, for the artist, as an act of remaining present in a time of chaos.
Stephen Towns, Go Down Moses, 2020

Natural and synthetic fabric, polyester and cotton thread, crystal glass beads, metal buttons.

SIZE (CM):124.5 x 96.5 cmSIZE (IN):49 x 38 in

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Stephen Towns, Joshua Fit the Battle of Jericho, 2020

Natural and synthetic fabric, polyester and cotton thread, crystal glass beads.

SIZE (CM):121.9 x 94 cmSIZE (IN):48 x 37 in

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A Songbook Remembered began with Towns’ experience of listening to spirituals and a continued interest in the links between past and present. The quilts, though reflective of the contemporary struggles of both a global pandemic and the nation’s confrontation with racial violence and inequality, simultaneously allude to and mirror the legacy of African American history through his imagery and choice of materials. In order to capture the feeling of history, Towns set his narratives between the late 1800s and early 1900s and sourced historical patterns and fabric to create a textural sense of time for his viewers. The work is both healing and revolutionary, with compositions that depict jubilant declarations of faith, quiet moments of solace, and vibrant imagery of resistance. As part of the gallery’s digital programming, the accompanying online exhibition will feature a playlist of African American spirituals curated by Stephen Towns, as well as a series of ‘De Buck Gallery Voices,’ the gallery’s intimate new audio project that allows visitors to listen to the artists themselves as they discuss pieces from their studios.
Stephen Towns, Mary Had a Baby, 2020

Natural and synthe fabric, polyester and coPon thread, crystal glass and resin beads, metal button.

SIZE (CM):119.4 x 93.3 cmSIZE (IN):47 x 36.75 in

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Stephen Towns, Somebody’s Knocking at Your Door, 2020

Natural and synthetic fabric, polyester and cotton thread, crystal glass beads.

SIZE (CM):99.1 x 123.2 cmSIZE (IN):39 x 48.5 in

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Stephen Towns is a painter and fiber artist working primarily in oil, acrylic and quilting. His work explores the African Diaspora and examines how American history influences contemporary society. Towns draws much of his visual inspiration from Medieval altarpieces, impressionist paintings, and wax cloth prints. The work he creates is deeply rooted in the constructs of race and its effects on society. It is developed in direct response to issues that have affected African-American culture–issues such as loss of ancestral roots, slavery, class, education, skin tone and religion. The subjects in Towns’s works are not only glimpses of the sitters; they are also a reflection of himself and mirror his struggle to attain a sense of self-knowledge, self-worth and spirituality. His practice provides an avenue for him to process all that he has learned about the violence of American history and imparted a framework on how to navigate and articulate the current anger and frustration that exists throughout the world today. Towns’ ongoing quilt series celebrates the aesthetic traditions of African American women while exploring America’s history of slavery and labor. The quilts speak to how fabric preserves memory, both in Towns’ often deeply personal connection to his materials as well as through the narratives he depicts of historical African Americans, including repeated references to Harriet Tubman.
Stephen Towns, Little David Play on Your Harp, 2020

Natural and synthetic fabric, polyester and cotton thread, crystal glass beads, glass and resin buttons.

SIZE (CM):102.9 x 124.5 cmSIZE (IN):40.5 x 49 in

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Stephen Towns was born in 1980 in Lincolnville, South Carolina, and received a Bachelor of Fine Art in painting from the University of South Carolina. His work has been exhibited nationally, including solo exhibitions at the Baltimore Museum of Art, Galerie Myrtis, York College, Goucher College, as well as group exhibitions at Jack Shainman Gallery: The School, August Wilson Cultural Center, Arlington Art Center, The David C. Driskell Center, Montpelier Arts Center, Star- Spangled Banner Flag House and Museum . His work has been featured in publications such as the New York Times, Artforum, the Washington Post, Hyperallergic, Cultured Magazine, AfroPunk, Hype Beast and the American Craft Council Magazine. Towns was honored as the inaugural recipient of the 2016 Municipal Art Society of Baltimore Travel Prize and received a Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance Rubys Artist Grant in 2015. In 2018, Towns was a semi-finalist for the Sondheim Artscape Prize and awarded a MD State Arts Council’s Individual Artist Award. Towns’s work is in the private collections of The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) , Art + Practice, artist Mark Bradford’s nonprofit based in Leimert Park, Los Angeles, The Petrucci Family Foundation , The Baltimore Museum of Art, the City of Charleston, South Carolina, The Nelson Atkins Museum, St. Louis, Missouri, and is held in private collections nationally and abroad . In 2022, Towns will exhibit Declaration and Resistance, a solo exhibition of paintings and quilts at the Westmoreland Museum of American Art, Pennsylvania. Towns currently lives and works in Baltimore, MD.
Stephen Towns, Wade in the Water, 2020

Natural and synthetic fabric, polyester and cotton thread, crystal glass beads.

SIZE (CM):99.1 x 116.8 cmSIZE (IN):39 x 46 in

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False Flag Gallery

FALSE FLAG pursues projects that would otherwise remain unrealized.

"Abstraction in the Black Diaspora | Curated by Tariku Shiferaw & Ayanna Dozier"

Artist: Tariku Shiferaw, Adebunmi Gbadebo, Alteronce Gumby, Ashanté Kindle

FALSE FLAG is pleased to present “Abstraction in the Black Diaspora,” curated by Tariku Shiferaw and Ayanna Dozier, with work by Adebunmi Gbadebo, Alteronce Gumby, Ashanté Kindle, and Shiferaw. A newly-published text by Ayanna Dozier, “Rebellious Inventions: Abstraction in the Black Diaspora,” accompanies the exhibition.

The exhibition is on view from October 24 through December 13, 2020. An extended opening reception will be held on October 24th - from 2pm to 7pm - to allow for staggered entries throughout the day to accommodate safety and social distancing measures. A series of remote discussions with the artists and curators will be scheduled throughout the exhibition’s run – dates forthcoming

Adebunmi Gbadebo, Blues People, 2020, 2020

Black hair, cotton, rice paper, indigo dye and printed photographs on rice paper

110 x 120 in 24 x 20 in each (variable)

(AdG.ABD.02)

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Adebunmi Gbadebo, Da Da, 2015

Human hair locks and wire

3x x 120 x 5 in (variable)

(AdG.ABD.03)

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Adebunmi Gbadebo, I Sang the Blues (diptych), 2018-2019

Human hair locks and thread

48 x 75 in

(AdG.ABD.01)

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Tariku Shiferaw, Kenya, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

72 x 108 in

(TS.ABD.01)

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Tariku Shiferaw, Get Me Home (Foxy Brown), 2020

Acrylic on canvas

60 x 48 in

(TS.ABD.02)

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Tariku Shiferaw, Nigeria, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

36 x 49 in

(TS.ABD.03)

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Alteronce Gumby, Black Star, 2019

Oil on panel

54 x 70 in

(AG.ABD.01)

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Alteronce Gumby, Seed of the Soul, 2020

Tempered glass & acrylic on wood

54 x 70 in

(AG.ABD.02)

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Ashanté Kindle, The Crown, 2020

Acrylic & spackle on canvas

120 x 120 in

(AK.ABD.01)

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Ashanté Kindle, Beep Me 911, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.02)

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Ashanté Kindle, Sock it to Me, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.03)

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Ashanté Kindle, Untitled Crown 10, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.09)

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Ashanté Kindle, Untitled Crown 11, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.10)

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Ashanté Kindle, Untitled Crown 5, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.07)

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Ashanté Kindle, Untitled Crown 6, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.06)

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Ashanté Kindle, Untitled Crown 7, 2020

Acrylic on canvas

16 x 16 in

(AK.ABD.05)

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